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What Do You Carry While Climbing - Basic Gear?

lxskllr

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I realize this will vary depending on what the exact job entails, but what do you all consider a generic climbing kit? I'm always a little unsure what to bring. This is my list for my locust using spurs + rope...

Silky
Chainsaw
flipline
Two extra prusiks
Trauma kit
A short length of Arborplex for lowering
5 rope loops for lowering
A short length of Hawkeye as a second lanyard/positioning
~30'(not sure exactly, but enough to do /something/?) Mercury line
4 Pirate biners
3 rated non locking biners to clip all the stuff to the saddle
If I think I might need to get down fast, a rescue 8, but I don't often carry that
 

Mick!

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I carry nothing unless I specifically need it, maybe one spare Krab on a rear loop, so I can use the tail of my climbing line for light lowering.

Harness, lifeline, flip line, spurs, helmet and chainsaw.
 

DMc

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Climbing line, lanyard, two spare carabiners, rope grab, chainsaw.

Why would you need a figure 8 for a fast descent?
 

cory

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Dave, also a handsaw I presume?

Back in the day I carried no handsaw, just chain saw:|:
 

Benjo75

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As little as possible for each job. But I'll carry a Silky strapped to my leg most of the time. Even if I don't think I'll need it, it will usually come in handy. For reaching the tail of a rope etc. I started wearing a camel back water pouch a couple years ago. Now I won't leave the ground without it. It also makes a good tending point for my rope runner. I fill it up and put it in the fridge the night before. Stays cool for a good while. I've started wearing it while mowing, raking and just about anything else. Works great in the bucket where a water jug will just get sawdust all in the lid.
 

cory

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So it doubles as a cool vest and water source. Interesting
 

lxskllr

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Why would you need a figure 8 for a fast descent?
My thinking is it's easier to control speed, and I don't use heat resistant prusik cord at this point. I got some beeline awhile ago, but I don't fully trust it. It's stiff, and doesn't grab fast. I want to get familiar with it in a low consequence scenario before I rely on it as my main hitch. I just grab what I'm used to to reduce uncertainty.
 

SkwerI

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If I am bleeding out and need to get down in a hurry, unhooking my main friction hitch and replacing it with a figure 8 is NOT on my list of options. Sorry, but that just sounds stupid to me. Unhook your lanyard and descend, period. If you can't do that with your friction hitch then WTF are you doing in the tree to begin with? Self extraction means being able to get yourself safely to the ground at any time. If your friction hitch cannot handle the job then change it.

Back in my climbing days I would have on my saddle-
lanyard, Silky handsaw and a couple loop runners with carabiners attached. I would also have my lifeline with friction hitch and a Petzl Pantin on my foot. I would either carry my saw up or have it sent up after getting into the canopy, depending on the tree.

The loop runners with carabiners attached can be used for dozens of different functions. Rigging, redirects, speedlining, hanging your chainsaw in the tree while you crawl out a limb with your handsaw, sending down (or up) other items, etc. They are rated for over 5000 lbs so I would even use them as an alternative temporary tie in when necessary. I used them constantly for anything and everything I could think of. When climbing, less gear is better so every single item needs to be worth the weight of carrying it. Items useful for multiple tasks are much more valuable than single use items.
 

lxskllr

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I swore I'd never climb without a handsaw again after pruning a willow, and having the cut close faster than anticipated, and trap my saw. I had to go down to get my silky to free it.
 

lxskllr

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If I need to get down in a hurry, unhooking my main friction hitch and replacing it with a figure 8 is NOT on my list of options. Sorry, but that just sounds stupid to me. Unhook your lanyard and descend, period. If you can't do that with your friction hitch then WTF are you doing in the tree to begin with? Self extraction means being able to get yourself safely to the ground at any time. If your friction hitch cannot handle the job then change it.

B
The 8 goes below the hitch. The only thing that has to be unclipped is the 8 so the rope can be easily installed. After that, keep your hand on the hitch to keep it from grabbing, and do the lowering with the 8. You still have use of the hitch as an emergency backup.
 

DMc

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My thinking is it's easier to control speed, and I don't use heat resistant prusik cord at this point. I got some beeline awhile ago, but I don't fully trust it. It's stiff, and doesn't grab fast. I want to get familiar with it in a low consequence scenario before I rely on it as my main hitch. I just grab what I'm used to to reduce uncertainty.
Most of my climbing career was done from on a tail tied system. That is, a prusic tied with the end of your climbing line. No friction saver, no heat resistant hitch cords. You can hit the ground as fast as you want or dare, even with that. We used to 'heat streak' our lines all the time when bailing from big Eucalyptus trees. No big deal.
 

DMc

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I swore I'd never climb without a handsaw again after pruning a willow, and having the cut close faster than anticipated, and trap my saw...
We learn by doing. Are you still having cuts trap your chainsaw?
 

lxskllr

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Are you still having cuts trap your chainsaw?
In-tree? No. On the ground? Maybe, sometimes

<.<
>.>

:^D

I almost always stick a wedge when bucking up wood. Ends up being easier for me. Not much thinking; just cutting.
 

Mick!

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Been thinking and drinking.

I will stand under a tree these days and know exactly how it’ll play out, of course nothing’s set in stone.

But if I need something like a block a rigging ring or whatever, I’ll know and I’ll take it with me.

I‘m a minimalist at heart, I hate clutter.
 

lxskllr

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That's why I made the thread Mick. I tend to be a maximalist, and thrive in clutter. My work belt's the same way if I don't control myself. Keep adding 'one more thing' that isn't a big deal by itself, but you end up with the camel and the straw, and my hips hurt, and my back acts up. Kind of wanted an idea of a reasonable loadout. I liked that CamelBack idea. Not really necessary for me at this point, but I'm gonna keep it in mind.
 

cory

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Generally, no. I of course will bring up all kinds of stuff as is needed, but I don't carry a hand as a standard part of my climbing setup.
Gotta say that is surprising to me, hard to figure!
 

DMc

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Well, I do have a chainsaw. If you are not going to be using a handsaw why carry one?

If I need something, the ground is not that far away and easy to get to.
 
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