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Tricks of the Trade.

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Drella

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I noticed this in the Sherrill catalog and I was hoping to get some feed-back here if anyone has used this technique.

If it works- and I can’t see why not, it would’ve saved me so much time and energy when standing in spurs, making a notch with nothing to tie into above.

I’ve been in situations where working at heights and making my notch on a 6’ diameter trunk, takes a considerable amount of jostling about to get the cut managed correctly.

Since I couldn’t find the actual photo to post, I fashioned one to explain what it is I mean…

Has anyone tried this or any other trick they would like to share???
 

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Monkeywithasaw

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i have but as soon as u set ur gaffs it tends to go loose and when ur cutting the notch it seem to throw u off balance
 
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Drella

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That's what I thought. I figured it would loosen the second you stand and release tension on the line,, making it slide down until caught on something.

Oh well,, any other tricks to share????
 

SkwerI

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You can just use a standard friction saver such as the Buckingham 2 ring style. That way you can stay tied in on your standard doubled line instead of switching over to SRT. I personally just use a loop runner (or two joined together for larger stems) with the attached steel biner. I choke the loop runner on the stem and run my lifeline through the biner (yes, I know it isn't locking. I didn't claim to be ANSI compliant) and drop down to do my work. Then I can either slack my line and shake down the loop runner or else pull my lifeline out and let the loop runner ride the log down if I don't feel like climbing back up to get it.

You asked for my trick, not what I'd recommend. ;)
 
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Mr. Sir

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The drawings are good, but inaccurate. You can't really go anywhere the way you've got them drawn.
 

SkwerI

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Yup, and the choked carabiner in the top drawing is upside down. You can NEVER load the gate, you ALWAYS load the spine. The gate needs to be facing up in that usage.
 
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Drella

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The drawings are good, but inaccurate. You can't really go anywhere the way you've got them drawn.
Dude,, you're killin me! I never said I knew what I was doing....:P
 
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Drella

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Yup, and the choked carabiner in the top drawing is upside down. You can NEVER load the gate, you ALWAYS load the spine. The gate needs to be facing up in that usage.
GAWD! Alright already,, it's just a drawing! Jeeeeeeze!....:whine:
 

treesandsurf

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I've used that trick in the first pic, works pretty well. Just don't forget about your line when you are making the backcut 8).

jp:D
 

Old Monkey

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I just make my back cut about an inch higher than my face and after the piece is off use the little notch on both sides for my climb line. When I am done cutting my face I just flip the line over the stem and put it bellow the block. All that stuff above seems like it would slow you down.
 

Old Monkey

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I had to reread what a read twice to get that. I think I was standing in the sun too much today.
 

DMc

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I agree with Butch. In most instances, just step down, make your cut and be done with it.

However, there are times when things are tangled up below and you know that you are just going to be sitting around enjoying the view for awhile. That's when I have used a setup similar to the second picture.

I will often work a big spar with two flip lines. I just found that it works well for me. To set up as in picture 2, I will just take off one of my flip lines (they generally have a snap hook on one end and a snap hook on the friction adjuster) and attach my climbing line to those hooks, leaving them about 6 to 8 " apart as in the second picture. It will hold just fine for dropping down 10 or 20', whatever your next cut is going to be (now, 5' 11 7/8"); take your time making your undercut, relax. When it comes time to get movin' again, just release tension, give your climbing line a flip and the whole setup will slide down to you.


Dave
 
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Drella

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I had to reread what a read twice to get that. I think I was standing in the sun too much today.
Hey wait a minute! Didn't you say that your brother was having an affair with his wife?:?

I want what you're on!:|:

OK, I'm sure this is no big deal, but I'm proud of it! I purchased this saddle- 'bet you can't guess what make,' and for the first time, it didn't have a sliding 'D' ring. I can't have that! What the saddle does have is multiple nylon tie-ins. So I utilized some old kermantle rope and fashioned it into a bridge using two of the more comfortable tie-ins.

Aren't I a genius!:D
 

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Mr. Sir

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What the heck is on your arm? Or is that your leg? :?






:D
 
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Drella

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I agree with Butch. In most instances, just step down, make your cut and be done with it.

Dave
Yeah, I agree with that too. But what I'm getting at is when there is nothing but log and no stubs suitable for holding your line. So instead of standing in spurs making your notch, whilst rotating and re-spurring around the tree, I was looking for a safe way to be not only be saftied,, but also hanging from a top that will let you move about freely while notching.. I was kinda hoping that the biner trick would work safely without splipping or dropping when weight is being transfered to your feet.

BTW: I like the rest of your idea..
 
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Mr. Sir

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Wasn't there a tat thread a while ago?
 
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Bounce

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I do what Darin does - cut a notch in the top of the spar to set my line in and just use my regular climbing system. I can then shake it off before falling the piece. But that's only when I might have to stand around for awhile waiting for the groundies to get the last piece out of the way. Otherwise I just walk down on my spurs.
 
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