The Tree House loves TreeStuff!

O.C.G.D. Thread, part two

DMc

TreeHouser
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
2,355
Location
Montana
Long lanyards made with 10mm or 11mm lines are great. It matters less, what size tree you are working on, and more on what needs to be done and what you have to work with.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
17,399
Location
Denmark
I got into the long lanyard thing when we trained for our first Sequoia adventure.

We figured 30 feet ougth to do, so we worked with that.

I've been using that length ever since as a short rope for small trees and as a lanyard/second rope for getting around the crown of big hardwoods.

All the guys in my team use it, and love it.
 

Tree09

Treehouser
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
4,104
Location
Peoria il
I think mine is longer yet, however much i can bunch up into the little ditty bag i have from new tribe (50-60'?). I'm a crappy climber, but it allows me to get to places i can't get to otherwise. I'm almost exclusively in spreading hardwoods. Two lanyards for climbing leaders when your climb line is not really helping makes a world of difference. So does being able to advance a line on the leader you are on, not even counting the remotely settable and retrievable redirect possibilities. I also carry a hook, which helps even more. On smaller pruning deals i don't even take a climb line.
 

Jonny

Treehouser
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
1,115
Location
Buffalo, NY
Ha! What are the odds? That looks nice!
Good to go for another 3,000 miles :)
I got some bulk nylon webbing, maybe I’ll put a 2 or 3’ chafe sleeve on it. Kinda slides nicely when fine tuning position.

I was thinking about getting a different aluminum snap or biner, as the swivel isn’t really needed for much on the end of a lanyard, but I don’t really use captive eye biners for anything else but lanyards, so screw it. The swivel biners were an EBay impulse buy because they were cheap and DMM which usually don’t go in the same sentence, but I didn’t really give much thought to what I’d use em for. I still got one left that I think I’ll put on a basal anchor.
 

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
6,961
Location
Olympia, WA
I just taped my throw line to a pen and wiggled it though a piece of tubular webbing. Got to get the spar down from a super speedline pondo pine. If it was summer, I could have made sure to be able to chunk it down the same day as limbing it up. Breaking out an old flip-line and the Gibbs tomorrow. Normally, I run my flip-lines with hitch cord. Usually don't deal with pitch, and I like to lower-out single-handed, and having a cuttable link never hurts.
 

Burnham

Woods walker
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
17,316
Location
Western Oregon
I just taped my throw line to a pen and wiggled it though a piece of tubular webbing. Got to get the spar down from a super speedline pondo pine. If it was summer, I could have made sure to be able to chunk it down the same day as limbing it up. Breaking out an old flip-line and the Gibbs tomorrow. Normally, I run my flip-lines with hitch cord. Usually don't deal with pitch, and I like to lower-out single-handed, and having a cuttable link never hurts.
Really, Sean? Hard to believe, for this fellow PNW'er. My own experience would differ in the extreme.
 

Bermy

Acolyte of the short bar
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
6,048
Location
Bermuda and Tasmania
I like the triple action isc snap, no swivel. I asked them to put that bit of chafe sleeve on it as I find my lanyards get more wear up near the biner end. I asked for 3' at first and then quickly realized that wasn't going to work! Settled on 6"...see if it helps extend the life a bit.
 

Marc-Antoine

TreeHouser
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
1,603
Location
France
The 3' sleeve is handy if your are on a big trunk, but as soon as you come down to the small diameters and need to be tied closely for your work positioning, the sleeve prevents you to take out enough slack. If you try to squeeze it and bunch it on the rope to get closer, it pushes back on your hitch/ascender and loosen it (or jams it if it's a sort of ropegrab, a toothed cam can even become completely stuck ).
I tried that before and the long sleeve didn't last long.
About 8" now on my climb lines.
 

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
6,961
Location
Olympia, WA
Really, Sean? Hard to believe, for this fellow PNW'er. My own experience would differ in the extreme.
Few pines up here, as its so wet.
Some pitch, like grand-fir, as our worst, again, not so common.

Doug-fir, move fast, limb it up, chunk it down before it gets sticky.

Pines are the worst. Used to have to use carb cleaner on saws about daily in the Sierras to clean off pitch, cutting all day on forestry projects.
 

Burnham

Woods walker
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
17,316
Location
Western Oregon
If you say so, Sean. I'll agree that Western white pine is miserably pitchy, though I have found ponderosa generally not so much so.

My experience is significantly different with Douglas fir, especially in the spring and early summer.

Noble fir is as bad as Grand ime, but maybe you are at too low an elevation to run across them much.
 

SeanKroll

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 13, 2016
Messages
6,961
Location
Olympia, WA
I'm at about 83 feet above sea level. 100' maybe.

Nobles aren't native to these parts.

Yes, doug-fir can be a problem, but no so much than I felt like I fought it much, overall. Spring and small branches can be pitch city. I had two guys have trouble thinning smaller doug-firs for light a handful of years back. Hitches were locking up on climb-lines.
 

ruel

TreeHouser
Joined
Jan 27, 2015
Messages
520
Location
Harpswell, Maine
Have you looked into other mill setups, seems like you're getting into it enough to look into bandsaw mills. Lucas style maybe for portability,
 

Jonny

Treehouser
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
1,115
Location
Buffalo, NY
I was amazed to learn the metal bandsaw in our maintenance shop has a built in shear, tack welder, and little grinding stone for slag. Just measure the bulk blade and make a new one right there.
Simple really I guess, but seemed ingenious, it’s a pretty old machine too. It makes the blades for the wood bandsaw too.
 

Tree09

Treehouser
Joined
Feb 28, 2017
Messages
4,104
Location
Peoria il
The older bandsaws came with the blade welding thing, but you can silver solder them too, without the built in thing. The grinder is to hit the weld/ braze, so it won't bump when it goes through the guides. It is also used to rough up and clean the metal for the braze to stick.
 

Jonny

Treehouser
Joined
Sep 29, 2018
Messages
1,115
Location
Buffalo, NY
I’ll check the make tomorrow, a lot of their machines are Delta but not sure about this saw.
Just thought it was really cool. Not very often I see something that makes perfect sense at that place. I’ll probably find the mfg date too if it’s not under a few coats of paint lol I’d guess 1970 at least.
 

treebilly

Student of the Jedi
Joined
Aug 10, 2014
Messages
4,699
Location
North Lawrence,OH
Picked up an ISC rigging wrench along with four quickies at the expo. Sorry no pics and I haven’t got to use them yet. My crew is drooling over the chance to test out the rigging wrench though
 
The Tree House Loves TreeStuff!
Top