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Flip line for a pole strap?

  • Thread starter IchWarriorMkII
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IchWarriorMkII

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So I saw a flip line in a Baileys Mag and it got me thinking...

I used to have a nice Klein leather pole strap but it was a little long. Worked great for climbing ( I hitchhike) but when I got to my aerial business... it was far too long.

So I swapped to a shorter belt, and now I can't hitch hike... but its great for keeping me close to pole when Im working...


Then I saw an adjustable flip line in the magazine, and I was impressed... An adjustable device to keep me on the pole! I can hitchhike up the pole then suck up the slack to get some work done...


http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdetail.asp?item=BLS+9168&catID=


Option A

http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdetail.asp?item=21180&catID=

Option B

I'd opt for a non-wire core one for sure... but is there a difference between a mechanical device that adjusts the rope or a prussik knot? Does one work better than the other? Is there any sort of specifications or something I should be aware of?
 

rbtree

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You're on the right track....Lose that scare strap, or better, toss it over a cliff.

Last used one 34.5 years ago, and I've been climbing for about 35.....

Steel core is stiffer, so flips better... and is a bit safer if a saw is gonna be used. Prussic adjusters are great...work both ways, a bit easier than an ascender. I use both, prefer mechanical on steel core, mainly due to working frequently in pitchy trees.
 
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Frans

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I was told that the pole straps work best on poles because the poles are very rough and splintery. A normal rope gets chewed up from poles.

Is this true? I have only climbed a few poles in my time and I did notice that they are difficult to climb and very very splintery.
 

Al Smith

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I used to use a 6 inch extension on my belt for fat old class one 60 footers. The danged plump things are about 2 feet thick at the base.After getting about half way up you hook the belt passed the extension , and half way down you again use the extension .

The only way you can climb a plump pole is to hitch hike unless you have arms as long as an ape .

Oh,poles aren't all that rough unless thev'e had the gaffs laid to them quite a bit which usually is a rarity .
 
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BostonBull

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Frans that is true.

Rope lanyards, and for that matter rope covered wire core lanyards, will not last very long.

There is a reason linesman dont climb with these. I was a linesman for over 5 years, and never saw one on any crews. I aksed one time at a smaller co. the answer was, you bring that into work, you might as well turn around and go home........too dangerous.

If you get rope caught on a piece of strand, a staple, bad splinter, etc etc it will go through the rope, get stuck in the rope, or potentially split a few starnds.

Stick with the pole straps. I used to use a bashlin nylon starp 90% of the time. If I was climbing a brand new pole, or one of the green poles down south I would opt for the leather, more bite. BUT more weight as well.

Good luck!

What kind of linework do you do?
 
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IchWarriorMkII

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So we have a nay and a yay.

Im a telephone guy over here in Colorado.


Some poles can be pretty weathered and nasty, but the newer ones are good to go. I see the problem with the damage to the rope line...

I really don't get to climb that often, maybe once a week.
 

Stumper

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Ich, I think that you will find hardlay 3 strand rope very durable/seldom snagged and either prussik or mechanical adjustment quite easy to work with.
 
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Frans

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Just talked to my lineman friend and he said after many many years, the Utility company here (PG&E) has finally made it a requirement that lineman carry two (2) flip lines. One buck strap and one rope type w/ adjuster.

The reason is, apparently when the guys, or gals, go up the pole, they unhook to get around the cross member. So they have been unsecured for a minute while up the pole (no pun intended). I guess OSHA has finally cracked down.
I bet it took the lives of a few lineman to create this requirement. :(

Oh, and he also told me that he still doesn't understand why Lineman never use a rope to descend from the top of the pole.
He used to work for me so he knows tree work, and he thinks this is silly hooking down every pole. Unnecessary work.
 
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Bounce

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:what: Pole straps are intended for use on poles; I'm pretty sure that's why they're called pole straps. Fliplines are for use on trees. They do the same thing but in different ways. Pole straps are not easily adjustable while in use because telephone poles don't change diameter as much as trees do as you go up. Also, linemen don't use chainsaws, so there's no need for a steel core for safetly. Also, poles don't have any stubs poking out that you have to get the strap over, so any extra rigidity provided by a steel core would give no advantage on a pole. Fliplines are just the opposite of all this. A guy could probably make a pole strap work on a tree if he had to, but it would suck compared to a flipline.

To answer your question Frans, linemen don't use a rope to descend because there's no overhead attachment point for it that lets you retrieve it from the ground (i.e. a branch) and because they use belts, not saddles. If you tried to lower yourself while wearing a belt, you would fall out the bottom because they don't have leg straps. It's obvious they could probably learn a thing or two from tree climbers and be more efficient if they used saddles and a false crotch. I guess the real answer to your question "why do they do things the way they do?" is "because that's they way it's always been done." It's a stupid answer, but the truth nonetheless.
 
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Bounce

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To be fair, I should also point out that there's a lot of tree climbers out there who also use belts instead of saddles and therefore can't rappell to the ground. I imagine they're doing things this way for the same reason: because that's the way it's always been done. Linemen aren't the only ones doing it this way.
 
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fishhuntcutwood

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:what: Pole straps are intended for use on poles; I'm pretty sure that's why they're called pole straps. Fliplines are for use on trees. They do the same thing but in different ways. Pole straps are not easily adjustable while in use because telephone poles don't change diameter as much as trees do as you go up. Also, linemen don't use chainsaws, so there's no need for a steel core for safetly. Also, poles don't have any stubs poking out that you have to get the strap over, so any extra rigidity provided by a steel core would give no advantage on a pole. Fliplines are just the opposite of all this. A guy could probably make a pole strap work on a tree if he had to, but it would suck compared to a flipline.
;) Agreed. Right tool for the job.
 
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Frans

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I would think that because a pole strap is wide, it would be easy to 'flip' up the pole because it is stiff
 
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xtremetrees

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The pole strap lays flat against a tree and can easily burn into causing separation when roping down limbs/logs whatever.The rigging rope almost always lays against the tree when loaded.
 

NickfromWI

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What is "hitch hiking?"

I think the hardlay 3-strand rope suggestion was a good one. There are also some HARRRRD laid braided ropes that would stand up well in this use. The trick would be finding the right way to terminate them.

love
nick
 
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Wagnaw

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Why doesn't someone make a strap lanyard that is adjustable in the same way that adjustable cambium savers are adjustable? Friction savers with the two rings (like the ones from buckingham) would seem that they may stand up well to poles, and you could hook up a snap on the ends instead of a ring.
 
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fallguy

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Nick hitch hikeing is the linemans term for hooking the belt around the pole on the ground and you flip up as you climb. The other method that they used to use was called free hand climbing. Some Utilities required 2 belts so when you come to a cross arm you hook the belt over the arm before removing the one below. OHSA is cracking down on free hand climbing. I've always been a hitch hiker.
 

MasterBlaster

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I never could understand the "free climbing" a lotta lineman did. One slip and that's it. I've even seen it in commercials.

When I climb a pole for whatever, I use my frigging lanyard!
 
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IchWarriorMkII

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my deal is my hitchhiking belt isn't short enough to work as a work belt. So I could carry two belts... but that could get in the way.

Kudos to those that see why I want the rope (ADJUSTABLE LENGTH) vs. just using a static rope instead of a pole strap. Im in need of adjustability.

Call me a nancy, but I don't like to free hand. Sorry.


I guess, there is a conflict between if this is a good idea or bad. But for the good, what specific setup would you try out to test this theory? Im over my head now.

Wire core? How large in diameter?
 

NickfromWI

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Thank you for the hitch hiking definition.

So I'm thinking a solution might be something like the current model Rope Guide. It has an adjuster, but works on webbing.

love
nick
 
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BostonBull

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I can only remember a few times that I hitchhiked a pole, one was a 100', 00, highway crossing pole in Charlotte pulling starnd ACROSS 8 lanes of I-77 by hand....!

I know what you mean about having to re-adjust while up there. It sucks.

You should check out Line-man.com and see what everyone there is using.

Good Lcuk and Stay Safe!
 

Burnham

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Thank you for the hitch hiking definition.

So I'm thinking a solution might be something like the current model Rope Guide. It has an adjuster, but works on webbing.

love
nick
How about something along the lines of Buckingham's adjustable friction saver? I use a 72 inch model frequently to set a rappel anchor on a spar...the prusic loop works just fine on the flat webbing. Way cheaper than the Rope Guide.

http://www.wesspur.com/Friction-Savers/friction-saver.html
 
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