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1" Block

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RIVERRAT

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Any other out there this size? Dang thing is expensive!


1” Hobbs Block

The Hobbs Blocks is a great piece of hardware in any capacity. In the 1 " capacity it is the strongest block we carry, with bolted side plates, bronze bushing, and heavy duty aluminum body that stands up to heavy use. Impressive breaking strengths, wide cheek plates, and wide sheaves for maintaining good bend radius are some of the great features that have made this a classic design. Incredible 4 ton working load!
WLL 8,000 lbs. Breaking Strength 80,000 lbs.

$369.00 Item # pul401
 

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sotc

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wow that is spendy. they are nice blocks though, used to come with a bag
 
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RIVERRAT

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They are my favorite.
But no more than I would use a block that size I dont really want to spend that much
 
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RIVERRAT

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If I could locate the sheaves of the right size I would make the one.
 

rangerdanger

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Just spend the dough and go for the Hobbs block. We had either a 5/8 or 3/4 inch Hobbs a few years back, but it was stolen (along with all of our blocks/pulleys), but man, that thing could take some abuse and loads!!
 
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Drella

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Bahhhhhh! :big-cigar:

Just be done with it and get yourself one of these.



:headbang::headbang::headbang::headbang::headbang:
 
M

Mr. Sir

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Do you really need a block that big? Are you using 1" rope?

I have a couple of the 3/4" CMI steel blocks. Plenty big enough so far, and rated at 4,000 lb. WLL. Less than $100.00 :)
 

brendonv

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I use the 5/8" CMI SS pulleys/block whatever. Anything needing bigger than that I don't want to be in the tree when peices bigger are flying.
 
M

Mr. Sir

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I haven't had the need, nor the desire, to use anything larger than a 3/4" line in a tree.
 

SkwerI

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Jeff, if you're gonna rig an 8000 lb chunk while in the tree, who is going to run the rope for you? My biggest problem with big rigging is lack of competent ground help. Even if I had the rigging, I wouldn't have anyone to use it. Gotta take smaller chunks.

I agree with Brett. 3/4" is more than enough for the needs of most tree guys. 1" is specialty stuff that you use once or twice in your career, and it will be lost or dry rotted before you need it a third time.

Besides, I thought you said you didn't have big trees in Kansas?
 
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RIVERRAT

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Oh we have some big trees.
But when some of my issues at hand come to an end I plan on traveling more & further away from home to do tree work.

I was wanting the 1" block for some technical rigging schemes, I am trying to work out.
Wanting it more for its rope capacity than for its load rating...... Don't believe I will ever dump 4000 lbs. + on any block

Ive been home not able to do much. Under the Doc's orders to take it easy since my surgery last Mon.
My body is taking a break but my mind is busy figuring stuff.
 
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RIVERRAT

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He's got a 1" rope now though, gotta find something to do with it! :D;)
:lol: funny stuff.

The biggest rope I have is 7/8ths the one I all ready have, maybe got used twice a year maybe. A 3/4 would have worked most of those times.
 

wiley_p

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Jeff, if you're gonna rig an 8000 lb chunk while in the tree, who is going to run the rope for you? My biggest problem with big rigging is lack of competent ground help. Even if I had the rigging, I wouldn't have anyone to use it. Gotta take smaller chunks.

I agree with Brian. 3/4" is more than enough for the needs of most tree guys. 1" is specialty stuff that you use once or twice in your career, and it will be lost or dry rotted before you need it a third time.

Besides, I thought you said you didn't have big trees in Kansas?
Brian is right on. if you NEED the 1" rigging, hopefully you guy working the hole has room to let it run, and understands his job.

The last part of his statement is also almost true. I have 300' of 1" and a 1" Crosby block that I have used twice, and had 3 jobs that maybe I should have used it and I wouldn't have retired 3/4" rope. That said, can get a Crosby fpr about a 125.00 less, but it's damn heavy.:D
 
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lumberjack

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What's so nice about a Hobbs block?

A sheeve could be turned on a lathe insanely easy. A minimum 4:1 ratio d/D ratio for poly would be my recommendation.

I prefer ISC spring blocks.
 
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RIVERRAT

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Thanks Wiley. Dont think I could make one for that.

Again fellas I am not wanting it for the load rating. I am bored & just working some things out.
 

Al Smith

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I've got two 1" snatch blocks but I don't have a clue what the rating is on them,old for sure and rather heavy .In addition about 1200 feet of 1" three strand nylon .

Handy when you need them but obviously not used too often .
 

pantheraba

More biners!!!
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Jul 31, 2005
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I can't imagine ever having a use for something that big.
We needed a big one at Katrina...Billy borrowed this one from a company that serviced oil rigs...they tried to give him one about 3 feet in diameter (having fun with him, I think)...they found this one in the back corner of their warehouse, unused for years.

We ran the Warn winch cable thru it, up and over the rigging tree and used webbing and cable with a tractor to lower this piece off a house.
 

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Old Monkey

Treehouser
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Mar 9, 2005
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In California I had need of a 1" block, here, not so much. I remember how much fun it is pulling a bull rope and a 1" block up into a tree.
 

rbtree

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Jun 22, 2005
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I agree. My 3/4 inch line was showing some wear on the ends, so I got a longer 200 footer maybe 4 years ago. I've used it once, twice at most.

I do have a Bailey's knock off Hobbs style 3/4 inch block, that handles my 7/8th sling with chafe tubing just barely. Cost me way under $200. It's all you'd ever need for tree work.

Now that I have my HMWPE 9/16th line for lifting and pulling, the only reason I'd ever use that 3/4 is for butt hitching big wood that my 9/16th can't handle (since I don't have a 5/8th)
 
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RIVERRAT

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What's so nice about a Hobbs block?
Carl it has been my understanding that they use the very best of steel. Also their 5/8ths block has for many years been the benchmark for strength in that size.

I have seen other blocks bushings wear out. I have never seen this with a Hobbs.
But I by no means claim to be the final authority on this.
 
B

Bounce

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I've been trying to contact the mfgr of the Hobbs for 2 weeks now because they say they have replacement sheaves, axles, etc available to refurbish a worn out unit. However, I can't get anybody to return my call. Better bet would be to go down to your local marine hardware store and ask them for replacement sheaves for a 1" block and make your own. They're probably cheaper too.
 
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