Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 86

Thread: Let's fight about ropes vs wedges.

  1. #1
    Treehouser CoreyYLTG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    341

    Default Let's fight about ropes vs wedges.

    Side one: Arborist. Hanging a rope only takes skill and a throw ball. I'm not working with forest trees, I have huge canopies with hard to judge weight that loggers just don't see. I'm also working around roads, houses, power lines, and I'm not taking the risk. Plus I have plenty of people to pull the rope.

    Side two: loggers. Everything I have to fall trees with I have to carry. Between gas, oil, saw, axe, lunch, water, wedges, radio, saw tools, and extra socks I'm not adding rope. Even if I did who would pull it? I'm by myself. The trees I'm cutting also can have huge canopies, but there aren't houses around, however while hitting a house would be an insurance claim, hitting a transmission line is a federal crime.

    Maybe let's not fight but let's discuss. Or rather I don't think I have much valid input but would like to see the discussion.

  2. #2
    TreeHouser Sponsor Altissimus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    southern Vermont
    Posts
    10,581

    Default

    Apples and Oranges

  3. #3
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    6,748

    Default

    Loggers pull trees, when they are leaning out of bounds, like over a road, or power line.

    I wedge trees next to houses. The hinge does the steering, not the wedge or rope.

    A guy-line/ 90* retainer line is a different story.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

  4. #4
    Student of the Jedi Sponsor treebilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    North Lawrence,OH
    Age
    41
    Posts
    4,633

    Default

    I fell with what the situation calls for in my mind. Most of my trees are spars when it comes time to fell so it’s pretty easy to put a rope in since I’m already there anyhow. Because of this I’m probably not utilizing wedges to their capabilities. I personally think a pull line is “safer” but I also don’t need to put the board feet on the ground to get paid.
    -Rich

  5. #5
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Western Oregon
    Age
    65
    Posts
    18,833

    Default

    If we leave out the situation where a climber already has climbed the tree for whatever reason, I think we may make for a more focused discussion.

    Assuming that...

    If we accept that the hinge alone directs the tree to the lay (and if you don't accept that, go back to tree falling school ), then unless there is sufficient back lean to render wedging to the face either not possible, or requiring a lot of fancy back cutting and wedge placement (which I have detailed in older threads...maybe need to hunt that up for bumping...) that is more difficult than setting a pull line, why would you choose to do the more time consuming rope pull?

    Neither insures direction of fall by itself. That's a fact.

    I expect the answer to my question is, we do what we know how to do from what we learned from our mentors. And our mentors learned from theirs. It is an unusual person who can break out of that continuum.

    I learned both approaches from different mentors during the same time frame in my training and exposure, being in the USFS chainsaw protocol as taught by DD Dent while at the same time being heavily into the USFS Tree Climbing program. I think it's probably rare to get equal exposure to both paradigms.

    I may be either wanting the most expeditious method, or just lazy ...but I sure go for wedges unless there is an overwhelming reason that they are not a good choice.
    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  6. #6
    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Delavan, WI
    Age
    42
    Posts
    12,641

    Default

    I might be odd but I use wedges and ropes in the same tree. Best of both worlds IMO.

  7. #7
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Western Oregon
    Age
    65
    Posts
    18,833

    Default

    Sure, nothing odd about that.

    Insurance is a good thing. And in the case of pulling trees, I never count on the pulling line alone...always back up with wedges kept tight to keep up with the opening kerf as the pull develops.
    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  8. #8
    Student of the Jedi Sponsor treebilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    North Lawrence,OH
    Age
    41
    Posts
    4,633

    Default


    Same here
    -Rich

  9. #9
    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Delavan, WI
    Age
    42
    Posts
    12,641

    Default

    I am not alone! lol

  10. #10
    Forest Keeper forestkeepers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Kansas City
    Age
    43
    Posts
    411

    Default

    This thread feels oddly familiar -- Burnham being more comfortable with wedges... Sean discussing the pros & cons of ropes and wedges in certain situations...

    As for us, we use both. Today in fact, the maple spar was dropped with wedges and a pull line for a lever assist (mostly due to rot limiting the wedges' effectiveness, plus the 395 cutting a smidge crooked made the stump shot not as effective. We were talking about adding a bottle jack with a plate on top to our repertoire for stubborn, massive, odd trees.

    Forest Keepers Tree Care - serving Lawrence, Topeka & the greater Kansas City area
    https://www.forestkeepers.com