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The Official Work Pictures Thread

Jed

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Man, that is so glorious Reg. If only I were a Canadian. 😔

Gotta hate being that low on petrol, that high up though, eh?

Do you like the new 540? That's like my favorite saw now. 16" bar all day with square grind in any wood.
 
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RegC

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Hey Jed, That tree had a shear crack at the bottom, bent right over the highway, was swaying even without the wind. Solar pannelled traffic signals underneath. Lots of different pressure in that task mate. No thats the first gen 540
20200213_203246.jpg 20200213_203106.jpg
 

RegC

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Took a while, lost track of hours. Lot of waiting on traffic to pass. We had one lane closed and the other alternating the traffic. For every 5 mins of cutting I had to wait 15 for traffic to clear. I was eager to get it limbed and topped as quick as possible to get the sail off and relieve the stress off the fracture, but it didn't work like that because of the highway. I had to remain be calm and patient. And that was the second tree, the first was another big one but lifting at the root plate. Long day, I left my place at 5am and didn't get home until 8pm.
 

pete mctree

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Watched the footage & I see what you mean about patience & composure. 15 minutes static in a compromised tree must have seemed like an eternity- I often think composure & the ability to make sound decisions under pressure is a great attribute for anyone doing treework.
 

cory

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Agreed!! And Reg making noise about no more vids from him???


NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO:whine:
 

DMc

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... I had to remain be calm and patient. And that was the second tree, the first was another big one but lifting at the root plate...
So will you just keep on doing things this way? I find it hard to believe that a climber of your caliber needs to.
 

DMc

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Reg, you go to a job and with your years of experience, assess the best way to do that job. Then let some talking head say no, we can't do it that way, because what, not enough money, not enough time, or we can't inconvenience traffic that long?

It is your life and safety they are overriding, and if it is not them then it is you that is allowing it. Frankly, you are worth far more than any tree job can bring in.
 

Marc-Antoine

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Of course I do like watch it and the other ones. Your average work as you said is so much away from my own job, that it's really an other world. Add to that your skill level and you could as well be like an alien for me !
Hats off to you.:big-not-worthy:
Always something to look at and learn, even in your "simple" vids.
Please, keep going...
:big-tongue4:
 

RegC

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Reg, you go to a job and with your years of experience, assess the best way to do that job. Then let some talking head say no, we can't do it that way, because what, not enough money, not enough time, or we can't inconvenience traffic that long?

It is your life and safety they are overriding, and if it is not them then it is you that is allowing it. Frankly, you are worth far more than any tree job can bring in.
Ok Dave. Its not so much whether its worth my life, it is my life. Its what I always done.

This was very much a last minute emergency for everyone involved. The parks dep got in a panic upon identifying the spit and uprooting trees....and needed the them down immediately. The Tree company who deals with the work along that highway called myself, and Ryan (another contractor) became we are the best people to climb those trees if judged acceptable to do so.

While Vancouver Island, and BC in general might be overrun with Arborist companies and workers, certified and otherwise....there are very few that have experience of climbing and cutting old growth, let alone ones that are starting to collapse. Outside of that you have to look toward forestry, heli logging climbers.

I turned up that day with but a description of the situation. The question was put to me "can it be done this way ?" Certainly, nobody put a gun to my my head. I studied the tree long and hard, up close and a far. Im also very familiar with the weather in that valley, including the time it takes for a storm to peak starting from the first few gusts. You definitely dont need to stay up there just because you've started. But thats where experience comes in, a lesser guy might miss something critical. Imagine had I not agreed to come out that day, and received the news that someone had instead took my place and got killed in the process. I wouldn't want to be burdened with what iffs in such an aftermath.

As it all turned out my judgment of the situatuon was proved correct. Not reckless, but calculated and controlled to the very last log that I had to tip against the lean. All the other guys there were feeling the pressure too, even though they were stood safely on the ground. But Im glad they got to see the discipline and commitment involved.

When I drove home that night, 3 hours, I seemed to be surrounded by angry drivers rushing to be somewhere. Maybe they rush home and then be angry on Facebook or twitter too. Always angry or frustrated at someone else, never themselves. Me, I was enjoying and appreciating the heater from my truck, immensely. Enjoying the privilege of just being able to drive. Got home to see my kid through eyes that felt like brand new. My beer tasted tasted like the first one ever. You cant buy those feelings, you have to earn them. And I never truly experienced them from just being a spectator to others. I get similar appreciation working alone, or from whatever else requires a lot of mental strength and commitment. It keeps you honest, and thats not a bad thing
 

Burnham

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Well said, Reg.

But I can see Dave's point, too.

I sometimes found myself flipping back and forth on a decision to climb or cut a specific tree. The greater my experience and skills became, the less often was I unsure.
 

DMc

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... For every 5 mins of cutting I had to wait 15 for traffic to clear. I was eager to get it limbed and topped as quick as possible to get the sail off and relieve the stress off the fracture, but it didn't work like that because of the highway...
I was not in anyway recommending that you stop doing what you do, just that you do it within your own terms. Those folks on the highway could have waited the relatively short time it would have taken you to do as you wished.
 

RegC

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Well said, Reg.

But I can see Dave's point, too.

I sometimes found myself flipping back and forth on a decision to climb or cut a specific tree. The greater my experience and skills became, the less often was I unsure.
I would agree with him too, but it wasnt a case of being told 'this is how its to be done'. They asked me, I didn't ask them. The only uncertainty in my mind was the wind, not the task itself
 

RegC

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I was not in anyway recommending that you stop doing what you do, just that you do it within your own terms. Those folks on the highway could have waited the relatively short time it would have taken you to do as you wished.
Oh I see what you are saying, the 15 min waits. If the wind had started to worsen, they'd have just had to wait longer. Even though, for waits longer than 15mins you need a different permit which we didn't have.
 

SeanKroll

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Oct 13, 2016
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Almost all pushed in the drop zone.

Used a Coos Bay cut a lot on very long limbs ran needed to land flat or on the butt. When they popped, I pushed. There is a new tractor, implements, a toy hauler, and diesel tank under the carport.



This is my friend's place, a mile away.
Wednesday, I'll go back and chunk the spars down as big as possible, and flop spars. He's got a grapple bucket and kboom with grapple, so no extra cutting on the ground. PICT0017.JPG IMG_20200217_170235674.jpg
 

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cory

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Nice pic of the airborne top, brings to mind MB's famous one of him and an airborne top
 
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