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The Official Work Pictures Thread

pete mctree

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I always struggle stacking hard heads, even with some sawdust between them they still spit out too easily for my liking. I have migrated over to K&H as a result
 

SeanKroll

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Oct 13, 2016
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Training. Stripped the low limbs so he could fit it between orchard trees. Pull rope for his confidence to be able to beat it over next to the service drop, in front of the primaries. Redirected back to the base, so I could be an extra set of eyes at the stump...how many new fellers get over excited and cut right through part of the hinge!! Nice level cuts, and straight, even hinge.

' IMG_20191106_131209471.jpg

View from a dying fir in a root-disease pocket.

IMG_20191106_151732797.jpg

He said to fell it across the orchard, as he doesn't mind losing some trees that will probably be going over time for a driveway. I wanted to piece it down for less shatter and less wood moving, but got to the old break-out (one regrown leader broken off already), and decided I wasn't gaining much compared to the risk. Having cut off the below the old-breakout, big limbs will hopefully let me slot it through the orchard, only smashing one little tree.

IMG_20191106_151744727.jpg
 

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Burnham

Woods walker
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Mar 7, 2005
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Western Oregon
I have K and H and STIHL wedges ... I like both !
Stick with them, leave the steel splitting wedges for splitting. As to the soft metal wedges you mention...they are not (or were not when I was a working faller) aluminum...that would be too soft to drive more than once. Instead, they are a magnesium alloy, by slang term mags. Their profile is no different than hardheads or plastics; not wider, not steeper. Don't mess with success :).
 

SeanKroll

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Not pinched. I just snapped a pic when I walked around to check the kerfs. My first shot at the sloping cut was coming up a bit deep.

I was shooting between orchard trees and couldn't go farther to the side, so I re-cut. The homeowner said I could just fell it whole across the orchard. I was trying to reduce impact and resulting work, and concentrate the clean-up in one spot near the stump, until I got up that high up near the old break-out, then decided to pull it over. Only hit one tree out of a dozen or more. More will go in time, when he wants to put in a driveway.
 

SeanKroll

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Good Stuff!! Not a lot of time flying it. Easier to adjust to a different rope as it gets broken in. My drenaLine is pretty new and slick, and is my main long-line with it. I have an old piece of Poison Hyvee that is my short tree line/ very long lanyard for spreading trees.

At first the opening/ closing was stiff, but now its worn in smoothly.

Performance seems to be increasing as it wears in a bit. I'll adjust it one setting tighter, today, as it was getting hard to release. As mentioned, it might have a factor of the rope skinnying up a bit as it gets used.

If I had a new one, I'd try to do some longer descents on it to get it worn in before using with production pressure.

It's so small for spar work!

I always am vigilant about not cross-loading it along a branch. A thing that I love about the HH is that I can't really imagine being able to damage it, as its so skookum/ tough as nails.

I'd like to see some side-loading tests. Sometimes, seeing how a super-overloaded piece of gear breaks is reassuring to me. Seeing a wire-gate biner, sooo many years ago, maybe from Black Diamond, that was pulled to failure, and seeing that the failure was the nose-notch on the biner, which was the same in most other biners at the time, anc not the new-fangled wire was reassuring. I 'called' the ZigZag failure the first time I saw the design (could have easily been wrong). The Akimbo seems more stout that a ZZ picture (never seen a ZZ).


Been meaning to order a Rock-O wire-eye oval biner, to keep it from moving around. A rubber grommet/ bushing thingy that is replaceable for the Akimbo clip-in point would be sweet, so it's more compatible with other oval biners


I drive past the tree I flew the prototype in, many years ago. Awesome to see it come to fruition. I regret having missed @Porkbrick Jaime's GTG many years back. I bet he's a wild-brained guy, thinking of how he developed and built the Akimbo either literally or figuratively in his garage, and making his own saddles, dirtbag cabin, rocket stoves, and whatnot.
 
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DMc

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Jun 2, 2008
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Montana
Thanks, Sean. The Akimbo is no HH but it is tough enough to not baby it. I've had mine jammed up against trunks and limbs and it doesn't seem to faze it. I find, also, it responds better to big or strong inputs rather than tentative ones.
 

Bermy

Acolyte of the short bar
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May 3, 2008
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Bermuda and Tasmania
@SeanKroll that carabiner tie off at the top would get your hand smacked in other forums...
I use a revolver on an Alpine bfly, and I could hear people tut-tutting clear across half the planet.
I don't think I am going to be able to put anywhere near enough force on a biner in that configuration to cause it to fail...anybody care to comment?
 

flushcut

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Jan 15, 2011
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Delavan, WI
The steel biner (dual action auto-lock) I use for rigging is in that configuration all the time with no signs of bending. I would imagine the forces generated in rigging far exceed the forces generated in climbing. Plus it has been in service for five years.
 

DMc

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Jun 2, 2008
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Montana
The testing I have seen on choking a limb or spar with a carabiner has not supported the fears of eminent failure that this practice elicits. In most hardware vs rope situations, the rope is what fails.
 

Marc-Antoine

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Apr 17, 2011
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1,603
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France
The biner acts essentially as a redirect where the rope crosses it, so it sees even less load. On the medium and big diameters, the biner lays mostly flat on the bark and the side loading is very limited. The rope has to be choked on a small diameter to put some unneeded strain on the biner. In this case, I use to make a round turn before clipping my biner. No big deal.
Just put the opening away from the bark. I don't fear a breakage with my load, but at least that avoids stuffing the gate with bark's bits and shit.
 

SeanKroll

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Oct 13, 2016
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Yes, Fi some people would.
Some people would think I need a full kevlar suit, a metal cut protector on my two ropes, would never climb dead trees, and would never bang over big trees, and would never...

People do sooo many dangerous things on tree sites in the course of a day without realizing it, IME.
This is a calculated risk, like all the above.

Two eyes, two ears, ten fingers and toes, all original equipment.

When I get into small wood, smaller than some would ever climb into, I tend to switch to a Running Bowline. The spine on a steel biner won't break, but the gate action might get affected.
 
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