Spur cut or also called Flat cut explained

Reddog

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Al asked about a flat cut in another thread.

First off DON'T DO THIS, YOU HAVE NO CONTROL OVER WERE THE TREE IS GOING TO FALL!!! There is no hinge wood or face cut.

You start with a with high powered saw 066 or equivalent size. 090's were used a lot for this also. The bar only needs to go half way through the tree. So a lot used 20 to 24" bars.

You divide the tree into fourths or thirds based on what root Buttresses are on the tree. You then cut between the Buttresses and use them to support the tree. The last cuts made are to release the Buttresses. For the most part no wedges are used. You cut using the feel of the saw to keep from pinching it. As soon as you feel it pinching you pull out and go to another spot. Alot of folks back cut using the top of the bar so the sawdust packs into the cut helps hold it open.

Here is Al's picture for reference.
 
J

Jonseredbred

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Unlike what Reddog explained, we always put wedges just behind the side buttresses to get it to pop off the stump.
 

squisher

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I think they mentioned in another thread it's so that there's no fibre pull on trees where the wood is valuable.
 
N

Newfie

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I think they mentioned in another thread it's so that there's no fibre pull on trees where the wood is valuable.
Thanks, I guess I'll hunt that one up right now. You're alright for a Canadian. I don't care what Stumper says.;)
 

Reddog

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can you draw it for us?
The crayon shows up on my screen. :D

Think of it like cutting a stump off as low as you can before grinding it.
It is about the same thing.

I will not use it. I would rather cut a shallow notch on a veneer tree with a thin hinge. At least you have some control.
 

Dave Shepard

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So is this cut strictly for preventing fiber pull? Or is it also for heavy head leaners? Thanks.


Dave
 

Al Smith

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I can see where this cut would be benificial if you were mining for figure which is usually in the bottom 6 to 10 feet of the bottom log.

With that assumption,this place I live on was at one time owned by a family of high end cabinet makers who do grade A work,excellant.The 25 to 30 some acres of woods was sub divided and sold off in the early 70's .Before they left they snagged a few of the good lumber trees but not all.

It is also my assumption that some if not all of the white oak in this house was fabricated by them because their sister owned this home at one time.

I'm not a lumber man in any way form or fashion.However I do know that a prime log with nice figure is worth more than the rest of the tree.

Do a search for figured cherry,hard maple or walnut gun stock blanks and you will see what I mean.
 

squisher

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So is this cut strictly for preventing fiber pull? Or is it also for heavy head leaners? Thanks.


Dave
I've never heard of this cut before this but from reading the technique I'd say it's not for heavy head leaners due to it's unpredictable nature and the risk of getting pinched.
 

Reddog

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So is this cut strictly for preventing fiber pull? Or is it also for heavy head leaners? Thanks.


Dave
To reduce Fiber pull.
I know a couple guys that skidded on jobs that were cut this way. They hated it. If the wind was not blowing trees would be left standing on the stump. They would have to back into them with the skidder and push'em over.
Also a lot get hung up from no control on were they are going.
 

Reddog

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I've never heard of this cut before this but from reading the technique I'd say it's not for heavy head leaners due to it's unpredictable nature and the risk of getting pinched.
The Area's this seems to be used is Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois in that general area of the US.
 

Burnham

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Sounds like craziness to me, but if you followed Jer's suggestion I suppose you might not eventually get killed. Your saw is a different story :D.
 
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N

Newfie

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To reduce Fiber pull.
I know a couple guys that skidded on jobs that were cut this way. They hated it. If the wind was not blowing trees would be left standing on the stump. They would have to back into them with the skidder and push'em over.
Also a lot get hung up from no control an were they are going.
I was thinking that it might wreak havoc on the residual stand. More of a high grading technique I guess.
 

davidwyby

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I'm crazy, but this cut intrigues me. I've been watching for a tree to try it on. Have also heard it called "slick stump" or "felling over the saw". The method I read was the tree needs just a little lean (or breeze) that matches the lay. One uses a big saw and cuts in from the face. If it starts to pinch, pull out, and start another kerf...reaming as in bucking. Sometimes 3-4 kerfs are required to get thru the tree. Finally pass thru the center and out the back strap or trigger like in a bore cut. Everyone says the same thing...don't do it, it's dangerous, etc. The use of wedges or buttresses to help prevent pinch seems like it would help a lot.

Just theorizing...maybe an extremely shallow humboldt pretty deep. Approaching 50%. Cut one side where the hinge should be, insert wedge, then the other side, insert wedge, and out the back...still not much control, but less chance of pinch. I'd really like to see some video of it.

More out of the box stuff...a rope tensioned opposite the lean/lay to prevent pinch in the face/hinge portion of the tree that is then released and the trigger cut...just crazy spitballing. The problem with ropes is time. Production cutting doesn't have time for that.
 
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gf beranek

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An old acquaintance, named Raymond Merritt, once told me, "Jer, you don't need an undercut to fall a tree.... just cut it straight off the stump and it will fall." Never truer words spoken. Raymond was a timber faller. A bit risque to be next too on a strip, I might add, and even socially at the local pub. Raymond like to fight, too.

Now,, about what Raymond said, "just cut it straight off the stump."

I will add to that, there's a concept called "Stump Shot". A flat stump has no stump shot, and it is important in this line of work to always remember that.

A vertical stem, tree or spire of wood, without any stump shot has a very high propensity to kick off the cut... in the opposite direction it falls. And most especially if it has to fall through the limbs of neighboring trees.

I don't know the exact stats but I do know the risk of major injury / death from not understanding the concept of stump shot ranks in among the top of the list.

Until you learn where you can live without stump shot you should always use it.
 
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