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Gardening - Growing Your Own.

sotc

Dormant hero!!
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
21,739
Location
So. Oregon
Depends on the season. Summer.... Squash, tomatoes, peppers and corn I would say are my top 4
 

Paul B

I dig hammocks.
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
12,712
Location
Burnaby BC
for us its strawberries, blueberries, spuds, chives. A few individual herb plants as well.
 

Paul B

I dig hammocks.
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
12,712
Location
Burnaby BC
I have 3 tomato plants also but no production yet, it takes a special summer for us to get those working at my place. Lettuce, spinach and parsly just start to bolt here, too short of a photoperiod, they think its fall already. :)
 

Paul B

I dig hammocks.
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
12,712
Location
Burnaby BC
hm, I gave my 400W metal halide with ballast and batwing reflector to my pops in law a few years ago, I dont think he is using it though, maybe I will get it back someday. made a hella difference with my houseplants when I ran it up.
 

Old Monkey

Treehouser
Joined
Mar 9, 2005
Messages
8,758
My yard is filled with edibles. Strawberries on front, raspberries and grapes on the side, lettuce, peppers, corn, peas and zucchini in the back. I just planted a blackberry that should give us fruit next year. I also have a couple apple trees. Squash and beans are the easiest to start out with Butch. Cherry tomatoes are pretty fun and easy too.
 

sotc

Dormant hero!!
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
21,739
Location
So. Oregon
Things like lettuce and beans and peas are Spring and Fall here. Winter squash comes on late fall. Check with your extension office and see if they have a local gardening book.
 

TheTreeWiseMen

Redneck Limey
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
1,862
Location
The land of Rob.
This year we have; figs, peaches, melons, peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers and the usual herbs (basil, rosemary etc....) Go for it Chief! Growing stuff is easy and very enjoyable....especially harvest time!
 

woodworkingboy

TreeHouser
Joined
Aug 16, 2008
Messages
31,036
Location
Nippon
I like potatoes a lot so that is a given for me. I also like eggplant, so I have quite a few planted as well, the smaller local variety. Tomatoes, beans, lettuce, corn, carrots, green peppers and hot peppers, and some greens that aren't much known outside of asia. I planted radishes this year for the first time, a longer variety not the shorter ones. They are quite tasty, not so hot. Also I have a few herbs going.

Butch, some things are particularly easy to grow, but if you have a sunny location and some well drained soil that has nutrient, just about anything will grow. It can take some soil preparation, but once you get into the routine, easy peasy, and something to look forward to each year. Are you close to Doc? I remember a photo of his place, and it looked like there was room for a garden. Nothing in the market tastes nearly as good as fresh picked, generally. Healthy plants are a pleasure to see.
 

Tree Reb

TreeHouser
Joined
Oct 21, 2008
Messages
2,376
Location
N/W Sydney. NSW. Australia.
Leaf lettuce and Italian or English spinach are really easy to grow and just keep coming up if you let some go to seed.

Oak leaf lettuce last for ages, I've had them two feet tall and still picking leaves.

Too much fruit fly around here now to bother with most things I used to grow like tomatoes and capsicum.:(
 

woodworkingboy

TreeHouser
Joined
Aug 16, 2008
Messages
31,036
Location
Nippon
I don't spray against disease, tomatoes will get some for sure. Leaf spot or some mildew thing, it is already in the seeds. Late in the season the disease is pretty rampant, but I still can get a lot of things to eat.
 

stig

Patron saint of bore-cutters
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
17,325
Location
Denmark
Frigging Californians:lol:

In the winter you can grow snow here. Nothing else.

Even in summers here we can only grow the hardy stuff, which is why I have a large greenhouse and an even larger polytunnel.

Outdoors we grow potatoes, mostly because they are so good when new and small.
Beans aplenty, both those kind where you eat the whole thing and broadbeans.
Several varieties of beets, bok choi, sweat peas, carrots,fennel,kale,garlic, Swiss chard and an assortment of onions.

Under glass and poly we grow tomatoes ( 42 plants of 12 varieties this year) Bell peppers and especially chilies ( Guarillo,Jalapeno and TAM mild Jalapeno) I love jalapenos and can a bunch of them to spice things up during winter.

Then there are the herbs: parsley, summer savory, oregano, merian ( which I use for canning jalapenos) lots and lots of chilantro and basil.I just sowed 40 sweet basil plants and 40 red russet.
You can't have too much basil IMO. I make pesto and freeze it for winter.

We can a lot of stuff and freeze the rest. We have 3 freezers and are lokking for a fourth to hold some of the stuff from the new polytunnel.

We don't do berries much, the deer get into them, but we have some 50 fruit trees: apples, pears, plums and 18 different varieties of cherries.
When the cherries are ripe, friends and neighbours come and pick as many as they want, that is such a fine time.

I don't know what went wrong.
I probably read too much John Seymour at a young and impressionable age:lol:
 

Old Monkey

Treehouser
Joined
Mar 9, 2005
Messages
8,758
Don't go disparaging the hardships of a California winter. Sometimes it gets so cold you have to wear a hooded sweatshirt.
 

Cut4fun

Redneck Chainsaw Repair
Joined
Nov 27, 2007
Messages
2,629
We do tomatoes, bell, banana, hot and super hot peppers. mostly. Can you say homemade salsa.

Zucchini, cantaloupe, snow pea, cherry tomatoes, etc too.
 

woodworkingboy

TreeHouser
Joined
Aug 16, 2008
Messages
31,036
Location
Nippon
I live about twenty minutes away from a famous watermelon growing area in the country. Watermelon everywhere! It's also where I grow my taters, a friend has the use of land there. The soil is soft and rich, the color of chocolate, and yields wonderful results. With the vast majority of farmers being old and getting older, it is easy to find land for gardening, either for free or at a pittance. The owners are usually happy to have the weeds kept down. Growing professionally should be a pretty good occupation as time goes along and the suppliers become fewer. Farming has a bad rap, hard work for little return, and young people don't want to touch it. It seems like it wouldn't be all that difficult to make enough to live on, if you were set up. I guess you have to be able to get up before five too, one major drawback for me.
 

Cut4fun

Redneck Chainsaw Repair
Joined
Nov 27, 2007
Messages
2,629
The friend that hosted the Ohio GTG raises a 2 or more acres of garden. Then sales to the farmers market or auctions.

He said this is his way of helping to fund his kids college educations in the future.
 

Al Smith

Mac Daddy
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
13,938
Location
Northern Ohio
I live about 20 miles south of the famous Pandora cantalopes which in season sell relatively cheap ,damned good melons .

The little garden has around 20 tomato plants ,half dozen banana peppers and 5 cucumber plants .It won't have much until mid July early August .
 
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