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Double tie-in-points

pantheraba

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I snagged this comment by Jerry Beranek from the Buzz in a thread that dealt with double tie-in-points:

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/showf...n=97593&Words=&topic=1&Search=true#Post109377

Nicely done, Tod.

Double TIP's. Don't see it used very often. It's not everytime your target tree falls between the tip's. But even when it does a lot of people don't consider using the two tie in points to work from.

I took down some dead Bishop pine like that a few years ago. Tip's were near a hundred feet apart. Target trees were a few feet out of lead, but there was enough scope in the lines that not too much pressure was exerted on the trees. Worked them down starting from the tippy tops.

They came apart as well as could be expected. Wouldn't have done it anyother way. I used a micro pulley to fairlead the climb lines to a pantine, and just kind of walked up in the air right beside the trees.

Got it all on helmet cam. Ought to shorten it up and post it on the Tube.

Again, nicely done.


It made me remember one I did 2 years ago with 2 TIPs to remove a dead pine (yes, this was part of a thread in the Olde TreeHouse, too..I am "revisiting" the topic)

Here are some picts detailing the job.

Jerry, I would like to see your helmet cam video of your job...I want to understand better how you rigged the lines so that you "just kind of walked up in the air right beside the trees." I use a Pantin....your trick might come in handy.
 
F

Frans

Guest
In that thread Gary, I really like the idea of using the hitch climber to keep both climb lines together so they dont pull on opposite sides of the bridge
 

pantheraba

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The bark was still attached but the soft, punky rot was about 1 - 1.5 inches deep. When spurring, the gaff sunk completely up to the main shaft....deepest I have ever sunk spurs in before...also, the bark dropped off in big sheets.

We used my homemade Big Shot to set lines in neighboring pines that would allow me to swing back and away from the work tree if necessary. There was a gap behind me so that when I swung I would not hit another tree.

The TIPS were about 40-50 feet apart...when I tripped the release I had a swing about 10 feet from the spar.

There are more picts and discussions if somebody wants to see more at the Olde TreeHouse
http://gypoclimber.com/treehouse/vi...tdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=pine&start=60

In the last picture, the groundies had an escape route if the top was going to be landing too close to them...jump into a pond full of gators. :lol:
 

pantheraba

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B

Bounce

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I've heard this generally referred to as "double crotching." It isn't something I've had to do more than a few times. When I did, I suddenly appreciated the multiple attachment point on the bridge of my Buckingham Versatile saddle. My biggest fear in this kind of situation is that the dead tree you're working in will break off below you. Since you pretty much have to be connected to it with your flipline in order to get a stable position to cut from, any breaking below you would cause you to have a bad day. This happened to me once and I was only able to save myself by cutting my flipline with my chainsaw (it was a steel-core so this took a little while). I remember sawing away at the thing wondering if I'd get pulled in half before I could finish. Since then I've always used a plain rope flipline in this kind of situation. Anybody got a better solution? Did you have any kind of contingency plan in case this happened Gary?
 
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B

Bounce

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I bet it did! Plain rope under tension will part amazingly quickly from just a very slight nick. One of my previous employers used to do a demonstration of this once a year in which he would tie one end to a tree, the other to his truck, and pull the truck forward until the rope was like a bowstring. Then he'd barely even touch it with his handsaw and it would spring apart like it was being magnetically repulsed. It was an effective way to get his climber's to be very careful when working close to their lines with their saws.
 

pantheraba

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This happened to me once and I was only able to save myself by cutting my flipline with my chainsaw (it was a steel-core so this took a little while). I remember sawing away at the thing wondering if I'd get pulled in half before I could finish. Since then I've always used a plain rope flipline is this kind of situation. Anybody got a better solution? Did you have any kind of contingency plan in case this happened Gary?
My lanyard is plain rope, too...my contingency on this tree was to use the quick release (picture 2) to get free. I practiced it several times as I went up to see which way and how hard I had to pull the rope end.

I remember seeing a video, I think of Graeme McMahon, cutting a huge top out and scrambling like mad to get away from it as it fell. It was a long distance shot but it looked to me like he was pulling a quick release knot out of his lanyard. Here is the link...see what you think:

http://www.sherbrooketreeservice.com/files/1stlimbmainentrance.mpg
 
B

Bounce

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Ahhh, I was wondering what pic #2 was about. Now I get it. I think you're right about the video too; that's what it looked like to me. Interesting idea; it sounds a lot better than cutting one's lanyard! I'll play around with that the next chance I get. Thanks!
 

MasterBlaster

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I have one kinda like that.

<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/U0QEdrICSDc&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/U0QEdrICSDc&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>
 

Ax-Man

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I snagged this comment by Jerry Beranek from the Buzz in a thread that dealt with double tie-in-points:

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/showf...n=97593&Words=&topic=1&Search=true#Post109377

Nicely done, Tod.

Double TIP's. Don't see it used very often. It's not everytime your target tree falls between the tip's. But even when it does a lot of people don't consider using the two tie in points to work from.

I took down some dead Bishop pine like that a few years ago. Tip's were near a hundred feet apart. Target trees were a few feet out of lead, but there was enough scope in the lines that not too much pressure was exerted on the trees. Worked them down starting from the tippy tops.

They came apart as well as could be expected. Wouldn't have done it anyother way. I used a micro pulley to fairlead the climb lines to a pantine, and just kind of walked up in the air right beside the trees.

Got it all on helmet cam. Ought to shorten it up and post it on the Tube.

Again, nicely done.


It made me remember one I did 2 years ago with 2 TIPs to remove a dead pine (yes, this was part of a thread in the Olde TreeHouse, too..I am "revisiting" the topic)

Here are some picts detailing the job.

Jerry, I would like to see your helmet cam video of your job...I want to understand better how you rigged the lines so that you "just kind of walked up in the air right beside the trees." I use a Pantin....your trick might come in handy.
I saw that over at the Buzz, I 'd like to see that vid also. Don't forget us over here at the Treehouse Jerry.

I actually missed that thread over at the Buzz because I don't visit over there as much as I do here. Tod, always posts some good stuff. A climber may only need to use once or twice but is nice to know if and when the time comes to use it
 

gf beranek

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Yeah, Axe. The opportunity to use two tip's doesn't happen enough in my book. It's ones of those moments in this business we get to feel real special. Especially when you're at the tippy top of a dead and rotting tree, and feel safe. Now that is quality time.

I just learn how to post vids on the tube and I will embed the video link to the house too. But I have to learn how. I'll get it. Next week. YO!!!

Oh, yeah, Gary.... you got it down. Nice pines and smart thinking. Ain't it cool?
 

SkwerI

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Jerry, youtube is easy. You just have to create an id and register there first. Once you're registered it's self explanitory, just click on the link to upload and follow the steps. :)
 
B

Blinky

Guest
I haven't had many opportunities to use TIPs in two different trees but I get to prune big spreading oaks pretty often and I generally double crotch my way around the whole canopy. It's slower but I can reach a lot of places easily to make handsaw cuts where with a single TIP I would've had to do polesaw cuts.
 
M

Marc

Guest
Going back to Grahame vid, it alomst looked like he used the tail of his lifeline by passing it round the trunk twice and putting a bight under a turn, especially from his positioning, all you then doo is tug the bight out and kick away.
I'm only guessing and its similar to something i've done, be good to know exactly.

Another little trick is use your normal soft lanyard to pass a bight through a side D put a half twist in this then put another bight through this, the first bight should form a half hitch choke on the second, then for quick release use grab the biner and pull it apart.

Hope that makes sense without pics.
 
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