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Wedgel Direct

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ArborOmega

Guest
Has anyone used the Wedgel Direct tree injection system? How did you like it? Did you get good control out of the materials you injected?
 
W

wiltingoak

Guest
Won't get high enough pressure to intravascular treat a hardwood effectively, no matter what compound you're trying to administer.

Period.
 
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ArborOmega

Guest
So does the hardwood just reject the material then with this system? I have seen "blow outs" from too much pressure applied to tree injection systems. Are you saying this would happen with the wedgle direct system?
I have plenty of experience injecting trees, I have just never used this particular syatem and it looks too easy and good to be true.
 
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wiltingoak

Guest
Tried oaks for several days and administered with high hopes and prepared to measure the effectiveness by upper-story tissue analysis (even prepared a phosphorous die to measure dose/translocation distances). It was a study.

Never released a drop, couldn't. Of the Reds, Black, and White oak group.

Now conifers? I can't tell ya.

What are you thinking of treating and with what?
 
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ArborOmega

Guest
I manage the grounds for a University where it is very difficult to get a talll tree spray done. I have a massive alle' of willow oaks that have bad mite infestations and lecanium scale. Imidacloprid soil injections are possible, but expensive for the nuber of trees I have.I have extensive use in tree injection via drill/capsule method and tree iv with a pump tank, but the wedgle direct looks fast and easy. So before I dropped 500 bucks on the system I wanted to get some opinions on its use. You dont sound too enthused by the system though.
 

treelooker

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 24, 2005
Messages
1,013
Location
NC
Are the mites and scale that bad every year?

paclobutrazol is not a fungicide but may make it tougher for bugs to suck and provide other benefits.

Post a picture(s) of the site?
 
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ArborOmega

Guest
funny you suggest PBZ treelooker because I just ordered some to use on 8 of the trees. It is not a fungicide, but some studies have shown it has some fungicidal properties. I experimented with PBZ on pin oaks for BLS a few years ago and did not get great results.
The mites were bad last year, the scale was bad last year, and both bad this year. And the drought was a muther this year and my irrigation was down most of the summer. I can post a pick if I can find one in my archive.
 
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ArborOmega

Guest
You would choose injection in certain cases where soil drench is not applicable. e.g. alamo or arbortect injections for DED. I have also injected urban tree where the tree was too close to storm drains and run off or leeching was too large of a concern so you inject the tree. Also if a problem is immediate you would inject the tree for example imidacloprid like Merit can take up to 60 days to enter the vascular system through soil drenching or even longer if a tree has no access to water, but a root flare/trunk injection will be in the tree right away. Labor cost could also be a reason for some because you can usually inject the tree within a few minutes whereas soil drench may require a tank mix dragging hose, etc.

I looked for the requested pics of the site and have none. Ill have to take some.
 
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Mike Maas

Guest
Tried oaks for several days and administered with high hopes and prepared to measure the effectiveness by upper-story tissue analysis (even prepared a phosphorous die to measure dose/translocation distances). It was a study.

Never released a drop, couldn't. Of the Reds, Black, and White oak group.

Now conifers? I can't tell ya.

What are you thinking of treating and with what?
Were doing something wrong? Was there adequate soil moisture? Were there leaves? Were you putting the pointy end in the tree?
I've injected firewood, and watched the chemical ooze out the end of the log...
 
M

Mike Maas

Guest
WHen all you have is green wood and you want to show the customer they burn...:D
 
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