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Tillotson HL Carb Rebuild w/pics.

GASoline71

'cause chicks dig scars
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Hey gang... this is a basic Carb rebuild I did on the Tillotson HL carb that is in my old Homelite Zip. It was very basic and straightforward. Since this carb was in really good shape, with not much trash in the inlet screen at all, I did not drill out the Welch plug and replace it. I have never replaced a Welch plug, and have had good success on my rebuilds.

This is just the way I rebuild saw carbs. Some of you may do it differently… with that being said there may be a step or 2 “missing”. But like I said… this works for me, and always has.

The Tillotson HL is the bread and butter carb for Tilly… It was prevalent on almost all the older big cc saws… Stihl, Homelite, McCulloch, Remington, Poulan (I think). I’m sure it was used in a lot of non-saw related applications as well. So I had a couple hours and a few beers on hand… so I thought I would make this little picture show while I rebuilt the HL.

You will need a rebuild kit, a service manual (from Tilly’s website), assorted flat blade screwdrivers, a 7/16” open end wrench, a small 5/16” socket (I used a ¼” drive), a small pick, a small pair of pliers, some carb cleaner, & compressed air. EZ-PZ and simple. The service manual tells you how to drill out the Welch plug and replace it. But like I said… I left it alone.

Hope this will help some of you out. Also if I miss anything that some of you think needs to be done… by all means point it out to me. Even though I have been doing this for years… I still learn new stuff… Most saw carbs have the basic parts internaly like the HL does. There will always be some sort of control lever, lever pin, spring, and needle and seat. So this little tutorial can help out in most cases.

There are a lot of pics (almost 60)... so sorry for you dial uppers. I was a dial upper until recently... so I know how you feel. ;)

:):):)

Gary
 

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fallguy1960

Guest
Great job, I wish all shop manuals were that detailed. Thanks for the extra effort.
 
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RaisedByWolves

Guest
Horry shrit!



Thats an awesome how to!


Nice pics too. How many meg did you take them at?



.
 
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olyman

Guest
might add, on the newer saws--watch the carb to manifold gasket carefully. i redid a oly carb--but got the oregon kit. was fine till tried to fire it. it did, but poorly. removed the carb again!! and seen were the smash lines were on the carb.......bad...seems oly used a larger gasket than most--and the impulse hole you showed...... wasnt!!!!!! so actually had to get the gasket from oly!!!!!!!! good write gary!!!!!!!!
 

GASoline71

'cause chicks dig scars
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Thanks you guys. :)

It took a lot longer to prepare the pics for upload than it did to rebuild the carb! :lol:

Eric (RBW)... I put this up over at the House of Homelite too. It's in your "saw repair tutorial" section. As far as image size... I just resized them to 800 X 600 pixels. Whatever they came out in meg size i have no clue... but it worked!

Gary
 
C

Chisel Tooth

Guest
Excellent job Gary!
I would be leery about using anything as a sealant (except for finger nail polish) inside or on a carb. Another thing I do is, I use mixed fuel and I soak all my gaskets and diaphragms before assembly. Great job on the pix and the explanations. Thanks for all the work that went to making this.
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Magnus

TreeHouser
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Wonderful!!!!

Very well illustrated!

Just be clear, be very carefull when you mix old seats and needles.
Sometimes they don't mix, but that shows when you pressure it.

The needle that can lift is faster and more accurate to the metering diafragm.
 

GASoline71

'cause chicks dig scars
Joined
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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #22
Wonderful!!!!

Very well illustrated!

Just be clear, be very carefull when you mix old seats and needles.
Sometimes they don't mix, but that shows when you pressure it.

The needle that can lift is faster and more accurate to the metering diafragm.
Magnus, I always use the new needle with the new seat. I just reuse the old lever. The new needle would have sat too low in the old seat. :)

Gary
 

rumination

Migratory Hippie Arbolist
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Gary, I'll try to find the time tomorrow to compile those pictures into a power point presentation so that the whole thing is in a format that can be saved and passed around (with your permissions, of course). I think it would make a great reference material for mechanical dunces like myself.
 

Al Smith

Mac Daddy
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Mar 6, 2005
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Very good job indeed.My only comment about the HL series is the fact that the diaphragm and pumping capacity is much larger than the smaller HS series. As a result these carbs are a little bit more sensative to the heigth of the fuel shut off lever.Too low,it starves for fuel,too high it floods . The older large displacement saws seem to run a tad better if the low speed is set just a tad rich.In comparrison to a modern smaller engines these old duffers have a lot of piston to get moving when you hit the throttle .

This series of carbs is to chainsaws what the Stromberg 97 was to old hotrods,tried and true .
 
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