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Random picks of CODIT

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xtremetrees

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CODIT has two parts. The fi rst part involves the wood present at the time of
wounding. Part two involves wood added to the tree in subsequent years.

Tread lighty on my thread son this is your last warning!
 
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xtremetrees

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I believe it is a Georgia Oak which I learned this week grows only on Stone Mountain RJS.
I was referencing my book and ran out of time and had to go to another job.
 

sotc

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CODIT has two parts. The fi rst part involves the wood present at the time of
wounding. Part two involves wood added to the tree in subsequent years.

Tread lighty on my thread son this is your last warning!
actually there are 4 walls to codit, look at the black line in the first picture. lightly treading away :roll:
 
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xtremetrees

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Roots dont CODIT roots prune! my theory anyway. I dont think that black line is a boundary at all.

"Similar patterns were seen in other heartwood-forming trees such as this black locust. The diameter of the hollow was the diameter of the tree at the time of injury. Even after almost 40 years, the so-called "heartwood rotting fungi" did not spread outward into the heartwood that surrounded the hollow. These observations suggested that microorganisms could only infect wood that was first altered by injury.

And a pick from www.treedictionary.com
 

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Frans

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CODIT stands for: COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF DECAY IN TREES.

Thus any evidence of 'walling' off a wound can be attributed to CODIT.

A 'finished' or 'complete' CODIT would indeed encompass all 4 walls.

These pictures are two unusual examples of CODIT :
 

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xtremetrees

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I know this may sound mysterious and remote but I dont feel root CODIT at all, I think rather they shed dead woody parts partially or mainly because the abscence of sunlight which produces bark.
Frans I wonder if Jerrys sign/tag? he hung in that tree that beat him down on his first attempt has CODIT into the side of that monster redwood. I forget the year he hung it.
Willy do you still think roots CODIT?
 
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Frans

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Frans I wonder if Jerrys sign/tag? he hung in that tree that beat him down on his first attempt has CODIT into the side of that monster redwood. I forget the year he hung it.

Gosh, so many trees, so many DVDs, I have not the slightest idea which tree you are talking about.

Best to ask Gerry directly.
 
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xtremetrees

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I been looking for a few hours for that pick you just showed.
I stand corrected
 
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Frans

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Its cool. I like to learn new stuff myself and the only way to learn is to challenge old ideas and look at them in a new way.
 
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xtremetrees

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it werent a great codit pick i still dont see the codit but im sure its there
 
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Frans

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I thought about this a bit more.

Roots are comprised of woody roots and fibrous/hairy roots. The point at which roots interact with the soil is on the fibrous/hairy (absorbing) roots. These are very soft and delicate.

I wonder if at the point of attachment between the absorbing root and the woody root, their is an abscission layer?
If so, Robert could be correct in that these absorbing roots would re-act to being severed in much the same way that a leaf separates from the branch
 
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xtremetrees

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Mr. B, I was thinking it was a tag for some reason, wasn't it the first tree you attempted to climb and it beat you back, but you returned and tried again and made it to the top?
I cant imagine overcoming it with no formal training and what a manila rope at 300 feet?!!!!

I just don't understand how a tree works underground Stumper. I know they call it codit but its just so different underground. 1.) No sunlight, no ultraviolet rays. 2.) no O2 or air or even wind.
I guess I am sounding arrogant but I am just amazed at how it works. I need to do more research on root codit but the pick frans found is the only one I see on the whole internet and I'm sure Mr. Shigo gave it to us. Like how can a grass seed push up thru 4 inches of asphalt. I know they call it codit below ground as well as above but to me it just don't seem right.
Why does a hardwood codit a soft wood, the hardwood is slower growing but it will surround it in due time. I just don't understand stuff Stumper I will try to be more humble about it.
Heres a pick of CODIT stopping a fungus which I did not know it could.
 

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