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Delicious dilemma!

Burnham

Woods walker
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
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Western Oregon
Before me now is a choice I must make...I have a new 600' spool of Sterling HTP 10mm static. This is, to the best of my knowlege, the lowest stretch static kernmantle line on the market. I'll be using it pretty exclusively for SRT access to the tall conifers here in the PNW.

The choice I must decide on is if and/or to what lengths I should cut it.

I basically see three options...1) cut it in half, for two 300 footers; 2) split it at 200'/400'; 3) leave it whole.

I don't really care for the last option, though once in a while it would be sweet to have 600 continous feet....I have to pack my climbing kit cross-country often enough to give you pause...even though this line is light by any standard, at 5.3lbs/100 feet, 600' is still about 32 lbs.

So I've got a few thoughts on positives and negatives with the other two options, but I'd really like to hear any ideas y'all might have...including other options I have failed to take into account.

I'd especialy like to hear from those of you who have experience with this sort of climbing, but welcome all to give their opinion, of course.

Thanks.
 

NickfromWI

King of Splices
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
4,996
Location
Snowless California
I've thought about this one before. It seems for most big trees, a 300' is just perfect. But two 300s doesn't quite make sense.

My suggestions is the 400, 200.

What about 350, 250?

love
nick
 
B

Bounce

Guest
I know Butch, you're wondering why he doesn't just use a crane, right?
 
M

Mr. Sir

Guest
From the title, I thought this was going to be another "dinner" thread.
 

Burnham

Woods walker
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Mar 7, 2005
Messages
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Location
Western Oregon
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
OK, I can see some possibility there for the 350/250 split...how about developing your lines of reasoning for me?
 

SkwerI

Treehouser
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Messages
18,024
Location
central Florida
Burnham, I think it's all dependant on your application and the height of the trees you're climbing. Heck, I just ordered a new 200' and I'll be cutting that into a 75' and a 125'. But that works for the sizes of trees that I climb. If you're climbing 300' trees then a 600' rope is appropriate. I only hope that one day I'll have the opportunity to need a 600' rope.
;)
 

NickfromWI

King of Splices
Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Messages
4,996
Location
Snowless California
Well, the 300x2 option is a waste of rope, IMO.

350 gives you the blend of a couple less pounds to carry, still a looooong rope that will get you down a 200' tree, top to bottom with only 1 change over. Wait...the 250 will do that too. When I use a 200', I'm limited. If I make a handthrow to 90' (a huge throw, but possible), 200' is barely enough room to get up to the TIP, then back down to a ground anchor...especially if you prefer to anchor the rope to an adjacent tree that happens to be 6' DBH!

With a 250/350, I'd use the 250' on most days, then the 350 when I know I'm going to be encountering big trees.

What do YOU want to do?

love
nick

What're you carrying all this rope around for!?!
 

Burnham

Woods walker
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
18,410
Location
Western Oregon
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Well, the 300x2 option is a waste of rope, IMO.

350 gives you the blend of a couple less pounds to carry, still a looooong rope that will get you down a 200' tree, top to bottom with only 1 change over. Wait...the 250 will do that too. When I use a 200', I'm limited. If I make a handthrow to 90' (a huge throw, but possible), 200' is barely enough room to get up to the TIP, then back down to a ground anchor...especially if you prefer to anchor the rope to an adjacent tree that happens to be 6' DBH!

With a 250/350, I'd use the 250' on most days, then the 350 when I know I'm going to be encountering big trees.

What do YOU want to do?

love
nick

What're you carrying all this rope around for!?!
In answer to your last question, Nick me boy...I'm a rope whore, no help for it:D.

I won't be doing any handthrowing for SRT climbs...if I'm going to break out the ascenders then it's BigShot time. Usually 100'+, up to about 200' max for around here (the trees go taller, but I don't really like setting anchor points farther away from my eyes than that).

Most all of the time 300' has worked fine for my ascent lines, using KMIII...that's why I suggested the two 300's. I can't see why you'd consider it a waste of rope though...do you only have one rope of each length you regularly use? Also, I do a lot of training...having multiple numbers of many types of climbing gear is required to do that job well, imo (to be fair, that's a wrinkle few need consider, nor did I mention). I do take your points re the 350/250 split...valid line of thought for sure.

I do have one 400', and there have been some times when I was glad to have it.

I'm beginning to lean towards the 350/250 split, today anyway:).

I hate to cut a new spool, for some reason...:|:
 

SkwerI

Treehouser
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Sep 6, 2006
Messages
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Location
central Florida
In my early years of climbing, I rarely used a rope much longer than the height of the tree I was climbing. Just long enough to send my saw up after I tied in. Since almost all my work was removals I rarely needed to descend from the top of a tree. If I did, then I'd stop and retie on the way down. 'Safety' and 'aerial rescue' was never even considered. :|:
I guess I'm lucky to have made it through that stage.
 

MasterBlaster

Administrator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
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Location
Louisiana!
I was the same way. I always liked my rope to be as short as possible. I never thought about injury and the trouble it would take for me to hit the ground. Actually, it was bees that showed me the light.
 
M

Mr. Sir

Guest
I think you should go with the 350/250 split, then buy another spool and leave it at 600.
 

Stumper

Treehouser
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
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Location
Colorado
You should of course do a 360/240 split. Thus you will have rope lengths divisible by twelve in units of ten, giving you all the benefits of fortuitous numerology.
 
F

Frans

Guest
chop it in half and let me buy one hank of it. Mine is getting kind of flat in spots.
Not unsafe or anything, but when you are dangling around working your way up to the first branch 140' up, you tend to take a long hard look at those kind of things...
 
W

Will

Guest
You should of course do a 360/240 split. Thus you will have rope lengths divisible by twelve in units of ten, giving you all the benefits of fortuitous numerology.
I concur. another option would be to make up 150 split tails.:P
 
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