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Atv Timber Arch

Ax-Man

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What size tires are those??? How much are they rated for??? What is the diameter of the axle?? Is the axle a spindle or just a round rod???

Many questions I know, but I finally got my welder hooked up and I am going to try and fab a pull type log arch. I seen one that I might be able to duplicate that doesn't look all that complicated and I don't have to bend big pipe which I am not equipped to do anyway.

That looks pretty good
 
F

fallguy1960

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Ax-Man if you need large diameter pipe bent check around for a local eletrical contracor that has a hydralic conduit bender. They can bend up to 4'' schedule 80 counduit which is equal to schedule 40 black pipe.
 

Ax-Man

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I know just the people who can do that. I have seen their bender on a jobsite. It was impressive the size conduit they were bending. I was thinking of them too and if they could do it for a steel pipe.

Thanks
 

Big A

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What size tires are those??? How much are they rated for??? What is the diameter of the axle?? Is the axle a spindle or just a round rod???

Many questions I know, but I finally got my welder hooked up and I am going to try and fab a pull type log arch. I seen one that I might be able to duplicate that doesn't look all that complicated and I don't have to bend big pipe which I am not equipped to do anyway.

That looks pretty good
The tires are 22 11x8 low pressure (4lbs) to reduce ground impact on 8.5x8H2 rims. the axles are regular stub axles for trailers, swivel hitch up front so the arch doesnt turn the atv over. As I didnt have access to pipe bending equipt, this is al welded (bit rough but it works) The grapple is from NorthernToolUK, I think you have the parent company out there.
On searching around after I build this up, found far simpler designs, but this does work well. I've found for larger poles, its best to switch the grapple to a choker chain, gets better purchase on the wood. The spiky bit at the rear does a good job as it grips the timber once in place. I welded a couple of shackles on too so I can ratchet down tighter for long hauls over difficult terrain, but with the choker this proved unnecessary. The spikey bit is designed to swivel so the butt follows thru the trees easier.
Width is 4feet, overall length 7'6", wouldnt want any shorter as it turns sharp enough when reversing now, maybe pay to go to about 8' to slow the reversing turns down some more, but sying that its light enough to lift round to the butt.
 

TC3

Headache !
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Nice set-up. There's a guy here, stateside, that does log arches. Pretty good ol' boy... lost his young son to an airplane accident a few years back, I forget his name ?
The arch itself (just my opinion) is cumbersome & highly specialised. You've gotta have a trailer for it & the ATV, just kind of a clusterf**k, unless you do that type of work a lot ?
 

Big A

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Theresa, most have a trailer for gear anyways, when I'm using it its left onsite thru the job, just take the atv away each day. Not really a hassle, if you want a big grinder on site, you trail it there, a water bowser, a ride-on lawn tractor, etc. To have the right gear for the job ensures things go smoothly, and efficiently, so to take it to site is a relatively minor issue, in comparison to getting the job done.
 

Big A

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Moving trees into position using the timber arch, the root-balls were in heavy clay, as much as 2 of us could do to man-handle them, so I decided to try and use the arch, and it worked!! made life sooooo easy. Note the Swisher bucket scoop upfront of the quad, used for moving in the soil improver, saving barrowing in across rough terrain. :D
 

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TC3

Headache !
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I jumped the gun, pooh-poohing this invention, BigA.
It is really slick. The hydraulics make it handy as hell, ey ?!?
 

sotc

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are those lifting or skidding tongs? ive had alot of slipage with my skidding tongs. a chain choker seems ideal for skidding there, maybe along with the tongs so you can lift to set the choke
 

Big A

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I would pick that 'lil log up and just carry it before I'd go through all that.
:roll:
Haha, I should hope you would, Butch, it weighed next to nothing!! I was merely testing it's ability to latch on with the tongs. As you may have seen on Arbtalk, the main reason for this is lifting trees into their planting pits, their awkward shape with a lack of holds combined with just a bit too much weight makes them a PITA to manouvre into place. The site I'm planting at the minute will not allow any mini excavators etc due to being restricted by Conservation Area regulations, so this is a cheap, simple remedy to a problem.
 

Big A

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I'll see tomorrow (storms permitting) and post back my findings, weaknesses etc, and of course some pics (rain permitting). Total cost of the gizmo was £157, which if you relate it to a knackered back is damn cheap! :D
 

Big A

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Well heres the update, the crane lifts the trees for planting better than I'd hoped, the manouverability thru the planting area was very accurate. I then did a test lift with a piece of Duggie fir, which I knew was very heavy, as I'd struggled to roll it by hand. As SOTC suggested I lifted it with the grapple so I could throw some slings under it, then lifted on the furthest reach (0.5ton), using that to draw it in, then shortened the boom to 1ton, and lifted it in again. Transported it across the garden to an area where it can be take away. Very stable, and very happy with the way it works. :D
 

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