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Andersonville National Cemetery Pruning Project

pantheraba

More biners!!!
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near Atlanta
Carl (Lumberjack) and I worked on this project last year. It is a beautiful site with a large number of very old trees that date back to the Civil War. We met Blinky and TreeLooker (Guy Mayer) there, also.

The project date this year is Saturday, April 26th, 2008

Below is a blurb from the official site http://www.nps.gov/ande/

"Andersonville National Historic Site is the only park in the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war. Congress stated in the authorizing legislation that this park's purpose is "to provide an understanding of the overall prisoner of war story of the Civil War, to interpret the role of prisoner of war camps in history, to commemorate the sacrifice of Americans who lost thier lives in such camps, and to preserve the monuments located within the site."

The park has three main features: the National Prisoner of War Museum, the historic prison site, and the National Cemetery."

Here is the info from the official flyer to coordinate the project...I have it in pdf and rtf format if you want it emailed to you...PM me, if so.


Georgia Arborist Association
P.O. Box 3589, Loganville, GA 30052
www.georgiaarborist.org
(770) 554-3735

Andersonville National Historic Site
2nd Annual Volunteer Project

Andersonville National Historic Site
Web: http://www.nps.gov/ande/

Saturday, April 26th, 2008

Andersonville National Historic Site commemorates the experiences of all American Prisoners of War. The site of historic Camp Sumter (Andersonville Prison) is one of the main features of the park. Camp Sumter was built in early 1864 and was one of the largest of the many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. The park also features the National Prisoners of War Museum and Andersonville National Cemetery.

Eric Gansauer (Forestry Administrator), Hugh Tyer (Certified Arborist/Consultant), and Fred Boyles (Andersonville NHS) have arranged a volunteer pruning day on April 26, 2008 at this National Historic Site.

Volunteers are needed to help preserve and enhance the beauty of this National Historic Site. We will need experienced climbers, ground workers, and equipment.

If you are interested in volunteering, E-mail georgiaarborist@bellsouth.net or call
Donna Rayfield, Executive Director, Georgia Arborist Association, (770) 554-3735.
 

Bodean

Cali dreamer
Joined
Dec 9, 2005
Messages
6,895
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San Francisco, Kali
Great Photos, I love work collaborations.

Did they line you out or were y'all the experts and sought the trees that needed treatment?

Great stuff.
 

pantheraba

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Great Photos, I love work collaborations.

Did they line you out or were y'all the experts and sought the trees that needed treatment?

Great stuff.
Some folks had come in before us and had a lot of the lining up done...the picts of Carl and Guy checking trees was the day before work when Guy was still evaluating trees so they could be assigned for work on Saturday.

It was very well organized with excellent documentation of which trees needed work. I don't remember the exact details of how they had that set up...Carl might. I probably have the paperwork if I can find it.

Carl, Guy, Blinky...chime in whenever you can.
 

lumberjack

Young man on the go
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
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9,027
Location
Mississippi
Just saw the thread, chiming in!

Tearing up stuff is on whoever tore it up. Some of the trees have been seriously mangled by previous encounters with lowest bid tree guys.

They basically did a survey and made notes when a tree needed aerial work. They might say "deadwood" or something of that nature, but overall what was done was up to us, rip cuts and all. ;)
 

arborworks1

Treehouser
Joined
Oct 17, 2006
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Location
hartsville, sc
So are you guys going back this year? I am thinking I'll be able to make this trip, wanted to attend last year but work got in the way.
 
B

Blinky

Guest
Nice pics... I was the lucky boy that got that poison ivy tree. My forearms itched for a week after that... and I'm not allergic.

I don't think I can do it this year but if I can find a way to work it out, I'll be there.

The way i remember it, we did a standard crown cleaning, of all dead and hazard wood over 2" diameter on every tree we could get to. Guy made some recommendations on a lightening tree, removal I think, but it was to be done later.

Some of the trees there are amazing, mostly giant post oaks but there was a lot of variety all around.

Nice BBQ lunch and tree planting ceremony too.

Last year we were short of ground crew for the individual climbers that showed up... bring a groundie if you go. Full PPE was required, no sawing on the ground without chaps and stuff so be prepared. Good camping right next to the park.


That was such a great experience. It's solemn but uplifting place to work. If you can go, you should go, you won't regret it. Climbers come from all over.
 

treelooker

Treehouser
Joined
Jul 24, 2005
Messages
1,013
Location
NC
Eric G did the original inventory. he flagged 3 for closer inspection; blinky got to inspect and prune one of them and he did a fine job tho it was challenging. he also helped assess the one that got hit by lightning; we had to condemn it. :(

story on page 8 here http://www.tcia.org/PDFs/TCI_Mag_June_07.pdf

I'd like to go back; thanks for the tickle, gary; i'll see if they want to put some of our tax dollars to good use by buying lightning protection eqpt for us to install. ;)
 

pantheraba

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I'd like to go back; thanks for the tickle, gary; i'll see if they want to put some of our tax dollars to good use by buying lightning protection eqpt for us to install. ;)
Lightning protection would be a nice touch...hope it comes through.

Arborworks, hope you can make it..'twas a great opportunity to meet some fine folks and provide a needed service...I am looking forward to it again.
 
X

xtremetrees

Guest
I will try and make it again this year.
Thinning the canopy view circled area below as an animation photo examples of thinning printer-friendly page

Objectives: 1) Thinning allows sunlight to penetrate to interior foliage which will help keep interior branches alive. As a result, the diameter of the main branches increases near the trunk, making the main branches stronger. 2) Thinning also can reduce the incidence of foliage diseases by increasing air flow and allows more light to reach the ground beneath the tree. 3) More air passes through the canopy instead of pushing against it, so trees may resist storm damage better. 4) Thinning gives the tree a pleasing, lacy appearance that adds certain elegance to the landscape.



Before pruning, the canopy is very dense toward the outer edge. The canopy might be shading desirable plants below.


Remove small branches from the outside portion of the canopy, not from the interior.


After thinning, the outer portion of the canopy is thinner. Little has changed on the interior of the canopy because few branches were removed from there.


Removing only lower and interior branches results in a weak tree. This so-called lions-tailing causes problems. DO NOT prune trees in this manner.


Introduction: Thinning reduces density of live branches in a tree. The entire canopy can be thinned or just a portion. Thinning increases light penetration and air movement through the canopy and reduces weight. Increased light and air stimulates and maintains interior foliage which can encourage taper on scaffold branches. Thinning toward the tips of a branch can reduce the wind-sail effect of foliar clumps in the crown, and relieve the weight of heavy limbs. Proper thinning should retain canopy shape. Clearing out inner foliage can have adverse effects on the tree and should be avoided. Vigorous production of watersprouts on interior limbs is often a sign of over-thinning.

Give the most consideration to performing canopy thinning in locations where the root zone is restricted by urban structures such as curbs, streets, sidewalks, and buildings. Roots are often deflected by these structures, making the trees less stable compared to trees in an area where roots can grow unimpeded. Trees in open, exposed, and windy situations also are good candidates for thinning. Thinning can be used to increase the light reaching the ground beneath a tree. Do not remove many live branches, even small ones, from the interior portion of the canopy or from the lower half of the main branches. The size range of parts to be removed, the location in the canopy, and the percentage of live foliage to be removed should be specified by the arborist.

Execution: Thinning does not influence the size or shape of the tree. Thinning should result in an even distribution of branches along individual limbs, not a grouping toward the ends. Do this by removing some of the branches from the edge of the canopy, not from the interior! Caution must be taken not to create an effect known as lion tailing, which is caused by removing an excessive number of interior laterals and foliage. This displaces foliar weight to the ends of the branches and may result in sunburned bark tissue, watersprouts, reduced branch taper, weakened branch structure, and breakage. Before thinning, first, clean the canopy, then proceed with thinning as follows.

Do not remove more than about 15 to 20% of the live foliage on a mature tree at one time or sprouting may result. Often 5 to 10% is enough on mature trees. Excessive sprouting can be an indication that the tree was over-pruned. Up to about 25% of the live foliage can be thinned from young trees. Provided you did not remove more than this amount of live foliage while cleaning the canopy, prune small branches from the edge of the canopy. A handsaw or small chain saw is usually the appropriate tool for this job; taking a large chain saw to do this work in the tree can tempt the arborist to remove large diameter branches which would be inappropriate. Thinning is a delicate process that removes small diameter (usually 1-2 inch) branches. Remove those growing parallel and close to nearby branches or those competing for the same space in the canopy. Appropriately thinned trees may not look like they were pruned.
Credit: Author unknown
 

lumberjack

Young man on the go
Joined
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9,027
Location
Mississippi
The people that were there before us, a few years before from the looks of it, did some seriously shoddy work.
 

pantheraba

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Carl is headed my way later today. We'll stay at my place tonight and head down to Andersonville tomorrow, Friday. Ideally we will link up with Guy and Blinky and any other TreeHousers that will be there.

Check in if you plan to go so we can keep our eyes peeled for you.
 

MasterBlaster

Administrator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
97,613
Location
Louisiana!
I will try and make it again this year.
Thinning the canopy view circled area below as an animation photo examples of thinning printer-friendly page

Objectives: 1) Thinning allows sunlight to penetrate to interior foliage which will help keep interior branches alive. As a result, the diameter of the main branches increases near the trunk, making the main branches stronger. 2) Thinning also can reduce the incidence of foliage diseases by increasing air flow and allows more light to reach the ground beneath the tree. 3) More air passes through the canopy instead of pushing against it, so trees may resist storm damage better. 4) Thinning gives the tree a pleasing, lacy appearance that adds certain elegance to the landscape.



Before pruning, the canopy is very dense toward the outer edge. The canopy might be shading desirable plants below.


Remove small branches from the outside portion of the canopy, not from the interior.


After thinning, the outer portion of the canopy is thinner. Little has changed on the interior of the canopy because few branches were removed from there.


Removing only lower and interior branches results in a weak tree. This so-called lions-tailing causes problems. DO NOT prune trees in this manner.


Introduction: Thinning reduces density of live branches in a tree. The entire canopy can be thinned or just a portion. Thinning increases light penetration and air movement through the canopy and reduces weight. Increased light and air stimulates and maintains interior foliage which can encourage taper on scaffold branches. Thinning toward the tips of a branch can reduce the wind-sail effect of foliar clumps in the crown, and relieve the weight of heavy limbs. Proper thinning should retain canopy shape. Clearing out inner foliage can have adverse effects on the tree and should be avoided. Vigorous production of watersprouts on interior limbs is often a sign of over-thinning.

Give the most consideration to performing canopy thinning in locations where the root zone is restricted by urban structures such as curbs, streets, sidewalks, and buildings. Roots are often deflected by these structures, making the trees less stable compared to trees in an area where roots can grow unimpeded. Trees in open, exposed, and windy situations also are good candidates for thinning. Thinning can be used to increase the light reaching the ground beneath a tree. Do not remove many live branches, even small ones, from the interior portion of the canopy or from the lower half of the main branches. The size range of parts to be removed, the location in the canopy, and the percentage of live foliage to be removed should be specified by the arborist.

Execution: Thinning does not influence the size or shape of the tree. Thinning should result in an even distribution of branches along individual limbs, not a grouping toward the ends. Do this by removing some of the branches from the edge of the canopy, not from the interior! Caution must be taken not to create an effect known as lion tailing, which is caused by removing an excessive number of interior laterals and foliage. This displaces foliar weight to the ends of the branches and may result in sunburned bark tissue, watersprouts, reduced branch taper, weakened branch structure, and breakage. Before thinning, first, clean the canopy, then proceed with thinning as follows.

Do not remove more than about 15 to 20% of the live foliage on a mature tree at one time or sprouting may result. Often 5 to 10% is enough on mature trees. Excessive sprouting can be an indication that the tree was over-pruned. Up to about 25% of the live foliage can be thinned from young trees. Provided you did not remove more than this amount of live foliage while cleaning the canopy, prune small branches from the edge of the canopy. A handsaw or small chain saw is usually the appropriate tool for this job; taking a large chain saw to do this work in the tree can tempt the arborist to remove large diameter branches which would be inappropriate. Thinning is a delicate process that removes small diameter (usually 1-2 inch) branches. Remove those growing parallel and close to nearby branches or those competing for the same space in the canopy. Appropriately thinned trees may not look like they were pruned.
Credit: Author unknown
Who are you posting to, Robert?
 

lumberjack

Young man on the go
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
9,027
Location
Mississippi
I'm done working, fixing to get a shower and get the gear packed up so I can head to the mystical Pantherlandaba.
 
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