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Thread: Best cut for clearing roads with heavy equipment

  1. #11
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theTreeSpyder View Post
    1 grain of sand uncrushable silicate averages 18 cutting surfaces per grain and chain saw can use as sandblaster to turn chain knives into trying to cut with back of spoon profile!
    Laughing at the understood irony! Now that is a quotable quote for your thread, Cory!

  2. #12
    TreeHouser Brock Mayo's Avatar
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    I think understood almost all of that post Kenny! I've definitely turned my share of chain knives into spoons
    Are you saying that when you crush sand down to its smallest size, the average grain will be an octadecagon?

  3. #13
    TreeHouser Brock Mayo's Avatar
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    Man I was only thinking in 2d, maybe some kind of deltahedron?

  4. #14
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
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    And I have a tough time going beyond a tetrahedron!

  5. #15
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    1 grain of sand uncrushable silicate averages 18 cutting surfaces per grain
    That statement should be reformulated. What cuts isn't the surfaces themselves, but the edges between them.
    Surface does nothing excepted spreading the load or /and giving a sliding area.
    See the spooned chainsaw teeth? you have only surfaces against the wood, no edge.

  6. #16
    TreeHouser Sponsor theTreeSpyder's Avatar
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    i see what you mean;
    but meant as these surfaces hone to edge, that cuts yes as surface sides can also serve to cleave apart wider;
    >>all in all a destructive cutting/grinding machine when given power.
    .
    i believe i am quoting some far off memory about sand 18 sides/edges average.
    >>but in any case;i think gives proper working imagery model to go by.
    .
    Have same imagery (by any name please);
    for grains of sand working into rope internals,
    then silently hidden and protected, are powered by loaded usage to work back and forth; and tension contraction of loading and unloading itself i think, to include cranking around arcs in lowering as we do; to saw rope fibers degrading strength over time.
    Flat Rope/webbing less strength loss on arc static on branch less deformation, but would get eaten up on lowering, and has 1 favorable bend axis to not deform too much, all round rope axis are same efficiency loss leveraged/bent at any angle .
    .
    This is why mountain/rescue disciplines go nuts if step on a line(let alone run car over), can press sand grain(s) thru jacket to theoretically give problems much later/unassociated to cause due to wide timeline
    >>treat rope/gear as 'sacred'.
    >>downgrade ropes in timely fashion from primary lifeline also overhead lifting and lowering positions.
    (to rule out this cumulative damage, and other low level/slow damage of UV, air etc.)
    .
    By extension would expect a clean carpet to last longer (and be lighter).
    "Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed" -Sir Francis Bacon
    We now return you to the safety of normal thinking peoples.
    ~ Please excuse the interruption; thanx -the mgmt. ~

  7. #17
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
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    I'll summarize. Dirt dulls chainsaws.



  8. #18
    TreeHouser Sponsor Altissimus's Avatar
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    Not trying to be argumentative but snap cuts and saw logs , I just don't see it as a plus. Make square cut measured length logs that will sell as you go , machine forwards them. Or leave them Tree length for forwarding and re-cut on flat landing somewhere.

  9. #19
    TreeHouser Sponsor theTreeSpyder's Avatar
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    i used to sandblast on bridges; then later on deep mine equipment with water/sand with so much power could still see spark in darker corners.
    Small grains can do all that as ally, but then too can tear up rope internals as foe, can do same razor thinned edge of steel tooth and face plates that cleave apart. Number of angles on each tooth to get right, to restore full functionality (then right amount of exposure /depth gauge to wood type/temp).
    .
    Amsteel is crazy azz strong Dyneema , 1/2" = 34,000 tensile and floats! (4" harbour tow ~1,800,000# tensile)
    Thus our thin Dyneema slings only need few strands of true Dyneema, add polyester cuz so slippery (teflonic?) and for color etc.
    >>we use nylon as more elastic than polyester; but much more rubber-band in polyester than Dyneema/or even more static Spectra builds. Longer molecule for more strength , less water absorption than Kevlar. Powered baby sand gran,eats it all.
    .
    "Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed" -Sir Francis Bacon
    We now return you to the safety of normal thinking peoples.
    ~ Please excuse the interruption; thanx -the mgmt. ~

  10. #20
    More biners!!! Sponsor pantheraba's Avatar
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    Good pictorial guide for rope wear. Thanks, Kenny.

    I learned rock climbing from the army Rangers as part of a survival course when I was 16. One week on the mountain with them running the show. They were rabidly nuts about stepping on ropes and getting the ropes dirty. We used stranded gold line rope which is three strand. All mistakes were punished with immediate push-ups. If you were on the ground....lucky. If you wer 50 feet up on a rock face do them anyway. Always feet uphill no matter where you were. Some of my push-ups were done 50 feet up like a handstand looking down the mountain.
    Gary