Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Best cut for clearing roads with heavy equipment

  1. #1
    TreeHouser Brock Mayo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Cottage Grove, OR
    Posts
    75

    Default Best cut for clearing roads with heavy equipment

    Hey all,
    I'm looking for some descriptions of snap cuts for large whole logs on the ground. Where you cut up the tree to the point where the machine can come along and snap the log off after you're onto the next tree. I could go grab the fundamentals, but I'm sure there are a lot of ways to do it.
    I think what I've heard of is plunge though the middle of the log and cut about the middle half of the tree. Then move up or down from that cut and come in from both sides. Much like a normal snap cut, but with three cuts instead of two.
    Anyhow, does this sound right? And what are some good rules or things to watch out for? Or are there other options that let the machine finish the job while you are out of harms way? Thanks!

    -Brock

  2. #2
    Treehouser Mellow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Sunshine State
    Posts
    1,194

    Default

    Why not just cut it like you were bucking timber? Seems to me it would be more dangerous to leave a log ready to snap rather than just bucking it up.
    "The mind is the limiting factor." ~Robin Brown, aka Brownie

  3. #3
    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Delavan, WI
    Age
    41
    Posts
    11,962

    Default

    I have used a bypass type cut. Why not just buck it all the way thru? Or leave a small strap to break.

  4. #4
    TreeHouser Nutball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Mt. Juliet, TN
    Posts
    826

    Default

    I'd think the best way to make a snap cut for machinery is to either leave a little holding wood right in the center of the log (if there's risk of the log rolling, so you don't know which way it will be picked up by the machine) or just leave a little holding strap on the bottom, which should break when the other end is lifted. Or use 2 closely overlapping cuts, so the wood in the middle can split apart easily.

    Just my thoughts

    Oh, and things to watch out for: Don't leave the holding strap of wood on the side of the log opposite from you. It's more difficult the other way, but having the strap on your side generally keeps the logs from hinging into you if there is tension in them.

  5. #5
    TreeHouser Brock Mayo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Cottage Grove, OR
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Just wondering for those binds that can be tricky to read, we have a crazy mess of trees down from a rare snow storm. Know a guy who got pretty banged up reading a bind wrong, and it seems like if a machine is coming to grab the tree, you'd always be safer to let the machine finish the cut. Anyhow, I've never tried the cut I described, just wondering what other folks might be using on the tricky ones? Thanks!

  6. #6
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    6,083

    Default

    If you cut most of the way through, a machine will commonly be able to break it.

    I'd say some well offset kerfs for a snap-cut.

    Rather than using a plastic wedge, consider cutting wood ones. Years back, and old houser,Chris, shared the trick of cutting through a top-bind, straight-through, with his logger uncle's trick. Cut until almost binding/ just starting to bind a little. Pull your saw out. Make a kerf on an angle to the first, offset a light 1/2". Angle the second kerf to make a small wedge. Let the wedge fall into the cut. Bang it in with the bottom of the bar. Ream a little to get in the bottom of the first kerft, and let the compression load up on the wedge until you can continue to cut down through, without binding. You can leave the bottom of the log uncut, ready to break.


    Don't always cross-cut. Slanting cuts can be easier to push or pull apart, as there is not End-binding after the cut is made. Hope that makes sense when you think it through. Same applies to all logs, don't get caught in the must-cross-cut as perpendicularly as possible mindset.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

  7. #7
    More biners!!! Sponsor pantheraba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    near Atlanta
    Age
    66
    Posts
    21,138

    Default

    Slant cut for a no end bind is a good concept. Thanks
    Gary

  8. #8
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,495

    Default


    There's some golden nuggets on the 'House, to be sure! (And a lot of fun had along the way!)

  9. #9
    TreeHouser Brock Mayo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Cottage Grove, OR
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Yeah I remember reading the make your own wedge post, it's pretty awesome, though I find reaming to be the most useful tip... I'm surprised how many folks I talk to don't know about reaming.
    Anyhow, thanks for the help everyone. One aspect of the cut I think I heard about is it shouldn't wreck your log when the machine breaks it. If you just leave uncut wood at the bottom or top of your cut, the machine will surely break it but it will also mess up the log.

  10. #10
    TreeHouser Sponsor theTreeSpyder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    332

    Default

    Sometimes cut to Dutch in direction of proposed pull is needed to get snap easiest.
    Can even cut face up and backcut down and throw rock in upward face.
    As long as solid stop inner and 'nose' of face still allowed to turn passed that point.
    .
    Like the slant cut for more linear compression of wanting to push itself apart.
    Twisted, torqued can be hard to calc where to plot reliefs and can get more conflicting forces, especially if cracked etc. so is not a monolith of 1 unjamming piece but rather different sections that can jam each other.
    .
    Drop across spars gives more determinable compressions and tensions, and spaces from ground/sand.
    .
    Consider peeling what bark can if in dirt on dirt side, even blow dry out dirt, then might try rinse to keep sand out of works.
    1 grain of sand uncrushable silicate averages 18 cutting surfaces per grain and chain saw can use as sandblaster to turn chain knives into trying to cut with back of spoon profile!
    "Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed" -Sir Francis Bacon
    We now return you to the safety of normal thinking peoples.
    ~ Please excuse the interruption; thanx -the mgmt. ~