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Thread: Beginner Fun with Stumps -- and more

  1. #1
    Treehouser Sponsor rfwoody's Avatar
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    Default Beginner Fun with Stumps -- and more



    => Cut a couple of ~4' stumps Saturday.

    => Had first try at using a stump grinder -- I think I'm an expert now.

    => Had first serious/confident attempt at hand filing the 25" chain on my ms461.


    (why didn't you just put this in the "What did you do today?" thread ? .... I was hoping I'd get more comments if I created its own thread)

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    >>> finally took 2 of us to roll stumps off stump

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    >>> ms660 w/ 36" bar
    >>> I was proud of my level cut ... at least this time -- I was aware of orientation of bar on 2 axis and effect of "pushing" torque on bar. (per Mr. Beranek)

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    >>> seems pretty easy to use... but if I was using it for real I would put a barrier in front of it.

    This was at my friend's house down the street who had the Pecan tree.
    These 2 big stumps were from the 2 Oak removals I had declined to bid on several months ago.

    Never cut off stumps this big before.
    The ms660 with 36" bar cut through the stumps a lot easier than I thought it would.
    Chain was still pretty new... never sharpened.

    > Stump grinder doesn't appear to be rocket science.
    My friend rented it from Home Depot for 24 hours for ~$300
    I had to leave right after I took this picture of grinding on one of these 4' stumps...
    but I estimate it took 1.5 or 2 hours to grind it down (need to ask him).

    I tried hand filing (no guides) the 25" chain on my ms461 ..... it wasn't a total disaster, but wasn't too good.
    I got medium "chips" when cross-cutting......... but it would NOT cut through the root flairs on the stumps.
    All I got was fine sawdust when tried to cut through root flairs. --- used a smaller saw instead

    Remembered Mr. Burnham's words about hand filing (to the effect) -- "the more I did it the better I got"
    ... maybe I didn't "get the gullet" enough.

    thanks for looking at this and for all/any comments!
    - Robert
    Slowly trying to make a profit in tree work with my neighborhood tree service.
    Thinking I want to become a Certified Arborist.
    www.PoagvilleTreeService.com

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    Treehouser Sponsor Jonny's Avatar
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    Looks like a neat machine, but can you see what you're grinding with the controls all the way in the back?
    Curious about the performance of hydraulic driven wheel as opposed to belts... I don't see how it could be faster but I'm no expert.

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    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
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    Looks good keep it up!

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    Hydraulic driven cutter wheel does loose some power, Carl says 20 to 25 percent if I recall correctly. The nice thing about it is any wheel stalls in the cut are not endangering belt slippage and thus glazing a belt. Good application of hydraulic power if you have a strong enough engine and great set up for a beginner in my opinion.

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    TreeHouser Nutball's Avatar
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    And no gearbox or shaft joints to break.

    Root flares will be harder to cut since you are making a rip cut.

    I like using these on a 660:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Oregon-Ri...a/112835103448

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/STIHL-3-8-c...S!-1:rk:1:pf:0

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    Treehouser Sponsor rfwoody's Avatar
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    Thanks all!

    Didn't think about the hydraulic benefits as y'all have observed... except my friend did point out that it was all run by hydraulics --- i.e the only thing the engine part does is pump hydraulic fluid.... because it did stall out from time to time.

    Thanks Nutball....
    Are those sprockets different than what one might buy from Madsen's?

    wow, $27 for 36" bar chain... sounds too good to be true.... are you sure it is not a (cheap) foreign knock-off?

    Have never tried skip-tooth chain.... that full-chisel chain... doesn't it require a triangle file?

    thanks.
    - Robert
    Slowly trying to make a profit in tree work with my neighborhood tree service.
    Thinking I want to become a Certified Arborist.
    www.PoagvilleTreeService.com

  7. #7
    TreeHouser Nutball's Avatar
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    It's legit, maybe not Stihl authorized, but it is just as durable as any Stihl chain. Great stuff, all I ever use for the most part. Actually the first Stihl chain I ever got was with a chinese Husqvarna 365 straight out of china. It stayed sharp through about 10 hickories while a Husqvarna chain lasted only 10 cuts.

    The sprockets are just 8 tooth plain Oregon rims instead of 7 tooth. That's the best deal on them I know.

  8. #8
    Treehouser Sponsor rfwoody's Avatar
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    thanks Nutball.

    So is the difference on the rims that they are 8 tooth instead of 7? .... if so, are 8 tooth rims interchangeable with a 7 tooth sprocket that came with the saw?
    (not sure what I have on there now).

    and if so.... what is the benefit of 8 tooth rim vs. 7?

    thanks!
    - Robert
    Slowly trying to make a profit in tree work with my neighborhood tree service.
    Thinking I want to become a Certified Arborist.
    www.PoagvilleTreeService.com

  9. #9
    Patron saint of bore-cutters Sponsor stig's Avatar
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    Faster chain speed.
    So it cuts faster if you really know how to sharpen it.

    In your case, I'd stick with the 7.

    Be aware that changing up to 8 on some saws will give you a chain speed in excess of what some saw protection pants can handle.

    For that reason we only let our apprentices run 7 on their 70 cc saws untill they have made it through a logging season.
    By then the saws will be like an extended part of their bodies and the chance of them getting cut, minimal.

    Getting through a season means having put about 1000-15000 cubic meters of hardwood on the ground, limbed and bucked.

    I don't think you are quite there yet.
    Deyr fÚ,
    deyja frŠndr,
    deyr sjalfr it sama,
    ek veit einn,
    at aldrei deyr:
    dˇmr um dau­an hvern.

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    TreeHouser Nutball's Avatar
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    Good point on safety, I didn't know that about the pants. Kickback energy can be higher too with faster chain speed.

    The 8t in the link is a direct replacement for the stock 7t that comes on those, and will fit both the bigger Stihls and Husqvarnas. It will allow you to get more tensioning room out of your chain too as I find a lot of new long chains tend to start off the tensioner already half way out.

    It will cut faster especially in small wood (good for when you get really familiar with running the 660 and want more out of it), and it compensates a loss of cutting speed by using skip chain.