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Thread: Storm-work strategies

  1. #11
    Patron saint of bore-cutters Sponsor stig's Avatar
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    The only roof repair I do is when I have busted the roof up myself.
    Deyr fÚ,
    deyja frŠndr,
    deyr sjalfr it sama,
    ek veit einn,
    at aldrei deyr:
    dˇmr um dau­an hvern.

  2. #12
    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
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    There it is derail! Storm damage not oopsie damage.

  3. #13
    Young man on the go Sponsor
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    We gladly tarp roofs and bill insurance companies after storms, it's easy money. I never considered a liability aspect of it, although on brief review it doesn't strike me as a concern.


    Regarding tricks/strategies, it largely depends on your setup, but the focus is to minimize the earners' non billable time. Having a runner to fetch things is well worth the expense, and can increase the billable rate. Having fuel to keep the machines running is another important consideration, since for us the equipment is what gives us the biggest advantage.

    After a bigger storm I'll send someone to Lowes to buy every tarp of meaningful size, within reason. If we don't use them they can be returned, but more often than not they'll either be billed or given to people that need them.

    I try to get out of raking the yard as much as possible. Its relatively easy/unskilled work and doesn't pay very well in comparison. Here, people commonly look to save money where they can.

    Depending on the situation, we'll upsell non insurance work (removals) while we're there, if there's something needing doing. That's mainly to the customer's benefit, since the insurance covered our mobilization there and a little extra money here or there helps.

    The biggest profitability skill I've found for insurance work is to be able to think and ARTICULATE like an adjuster/agent to play the game using the rules to your benefit (which invariably helps the customer/home owner as well.) It's not an us vs them situation, it's a simple game of following the policy/rules.
    Carl Rutherford

  4. #14
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    What would you say that would be adjuster-like?

    Thanks.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

  5. #15
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
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    'Sorry, that's not covered'.

    Lol.

  6. #16
    TreeHouse Administrator MasterBlaster's Avatar
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    Harz!!!

  7. #17
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    It good not to have to ask things like "what does listed property mean?", and "what's this about only $500 toward disposal?".



    Yesterday's tipped fir split a cedar, and laid it up into another tree, perched above the doug-fir on the deck.
    The agent explained that since the split cedar is not on the deck, its not covered, only the fir.

    The agent wants it all handled, but without saying we are handling it all.

    I know the customer from repeat work, and by my rep, so I suggested we simply take care of it all, and write down "1 fir removed from deck". Make it easy for everyone.




    He wants to really retain the upright fir, as it shades his deck and frames his view of water and hills, so this time he's heard what I'm saying about mulch over lawn under the tree, and is keeping the chips, right where the brush is, and where its easy access with hard, flat ground for a change of pace, even no septic!

    Had half or more of the fir weight off his deck, and hung the cedar top by dusk, lowering it across the open lawn, squeezed between rigging-point tree and deck, started at 2pm, about to head back to deal with the trunk.



    I've found that if you cut a log to the right size to be placed vertically beneath the tipped tree trunk, and use felling wedges between the prop-log and a tipped, but attached-at-the-rootplate tree, you can lift it off the house. Presumable, A bottle jack with an extension log or post will do the same.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

  8. #18
    Young man on the go Sponsor
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanKroll View Post
    What would you say that would be adjuster-like?

    Thanks.
    When I said articulate, I meant defending your position to the insurance adjuster. The purpose/requirement of insurance is to return the insured property to its condition before the claim to the limits of the policy. The main application for us is making the work accessible/doable.

    One example is from a storm in 2014, a tree was listing after the storm but not touching insured property. The agent and adjuster had already been out and said it wasn't covered. The listing tree's root system upset the fence (insured property) raising two sections maybe a couple feet at most. The insurance owed to have the fence back like it was before the storm. To make that happened meant removing the roots and leveling the dirt, doing that required removing the tree. I called the agent and adjuster, made my case, and they agreed. That was an $8200 in revenue 2 doors down from a $16k job from the same storm, in an "affordable" part of town.
    Carl Rutherford

  9. #19
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lumberjack View Post
    We gladly tarp roofs and bill insurance companies after storms, it's easy money. I never considered a liability aspect of it, although on brief review it doesn't strike me as a concern.
    Ding, ding! Same here -- done it a few times, usually for property owners on rentals. Gets them by for a week or two until they can get a roofer out to bid it and get the work done. Expectations aren't high and the insurance co. is footing the bill, so owners don't stress about the bill.

  10. #20
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    Bump for Eric H-L.


    A lady called for some old, big maple preservation after two recent wind storms. She told me that she was getting three bids. My schedule today just filled up, hearing that. I get to it later.


    Homeowners need to contact their agents. Some people wait for days. Weird.
    Someon


    Decide if the homeowner needs to pay up front, or if you can wait for the insurance company to pay. Someone may not have $1000 now to take a tree off their house, but the insurance will have $2500 in week.


    Tarps and tar in the truck. IF you can reasonably, safely, do some water protection for the homeowner, WITHOUT losing more work, you will gain work, and get paid for it. I had a 4x12 roof with two pierced spots that made it through the ceiling. Having tarps and roofing tar on hand can make you more of a hero.

    I went to get tarps and tar on that two-hole job. By the time I'd gotten back from town, there was someone else working on it. A double-scheduling...property manager and property owner calling different people in a panic. I was solo at that moment. Had I started the cutting, and waited for tarps and tar, or had them on-board, it would have mean an easy storm job and nice, millable cedar logs. Sink a saw in the wood! Stake your claim.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.