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Thread: Rigging Physics 101 -- Redirect Pulley

  1. #21
    TreeHouser Sponsor flushcut's Avatar
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    Warn is pretty much the gold standard for winches.

  2. #22
    Treehouser Sponsor Jonny's Avatar
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    So depending on which Warn winch you're considering, you might already be in the price range of a gas powered capstan winch, or maybe a Lewis winch.

    Just to make sure we're not missing out on something basic here, what kinda knot you gonna use to tie to the truck hitch? A bowline unties easy after yanking with a truck.

  3. #23
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
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    We've standardized on a doubled bowline for pulling with a truck -- comes undone very well no matter how much pull you've put on it (chip truck, log truck, skid steer).

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    Is factory reverse typically geared lower (more powerful gear ratio) than first gear, in passenger trucks? Medium duty?
    Not in my car and van. The reverse seems between 1 and 2. I have to use harder the clutch, backing on a slope when loaded.

    If you need a high torque /strong pull with a stick, but at a slower pace than allowed by the gear at this motor's speed, you can't do it otherwise than slipping continuously the clutch. That works well and can be precise enough but only for a relative short time because the clutch heats up quickly with all the excess of energy coming from the engine. Do it too long and the clutch is toast.

  5. #25
    TreeHouser Sponsor treesmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by squisher View Post
    Depends on the manual. Just got to know how to use a clutch. All my work trucks have been manuals. Every bucket, my old ghetto 1ton, 550, couple of different 350's. You can certainly pull decently with a manual if you have the slightest bit of skill with a clutch.
    I drove a 1995 Chevy 3/4 ton 4x4 for 13 years that had a 5-speed manual. I bypassed the clutch-starter switch right off the bat. When pulling a leaner, I'd pretension, notch and start back cut, then just lean in and wind the starter a second to further tension it (in 4-LO). I loved that manual tranny for pulling trees.
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  6. #26
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    There's a place for everything.

    As long as you don't run your clutch, stranding you vehicle where it is, you're golden.

    There is that problem of a learning curve.

    I've had an employee be more than willing to use my clutch to learn.


    The guy I mentioned, glazed his clutch down a steep, waterfront driveway. Slipped too much to get up the driveway. Expensive tow-bill on top of $3k for the clutch replacement. I have a hard time driving out of a lot of those driveways. I bet he blocked the lake-loop road a good while, not good publicity.

    Having the skilled, experienced operators to do things well, makes all the difference.



    Some gypo pulled a big old cottonwood for State Parks with his little Toyota, by chaining the frame to a tree, and using the winch. He knew what was solid, and what he could do (wedging, too, at least as a backup, if not obvious).

    Similarly, when we had hard pulls, we butted a skidder tire into a tree, or chained the skidder in place. At least, without chains, the skidder winch would skid the skidder if not secured, and the tree/ lean was big enough.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
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  7. #27
    Treehouser Sponsor rfwoody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burnham View Post
    Robert, in my experience, your truck (assuming top operating condition) is an excellent tool for the job. I drove one just like it for 7 years, over 80k miles, 80% on backwoods logging roads. A USFS rig.

    As for the question of Warn vs. Harbor Freight. I have no experience with the latter. They may be wonderful...or for all I know, crap. There are other manufacturers out there too. But again, I have extensive experience with 3 different Warn models, and no other. To be clear, I am definitely prejudiced, but with no decent standing for comparisons.

    But I do see the prices. A 12k Warn will run you about 400-500 dollars more than a 12k Badland (Harbor Freight). I'd spend that pissant bit of money more in the drop of a hat, for a tool I KNOW will work hard, and for a very long time. I'd go with Warn, myself.

    Now if you can get positive feedback from real people with real experience with the Badland models, I say go with that info...I just don't know anyone among my friends and fellow woods workers who has gone that route.
    Thanks and Thanks Mr. Burnham. That makes great sense.
    - Robert
    Slowly trying to make a profit in tree work with my neighborhood tree service.
    Thinking I want to become a Certified Arborist.
    www.PoagvilleTreeService.com

  8. #28
    Treehouser Sponsor rfwoody's Avatar
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    Thanks Sean and all!

    Johnny, I guess I would start with a Bowline.... for that reason that it can be untied after heavy loading.... it seems there were some other discussions about best way to tie a rope to a hitch, etc.(?)

    But I am a little concerned about the loss of strength of a Bowline ..... however it has been said by some (?) that most of the time the rope breaks at some place other than the knot?

    Hadn't thought about a gas winch...

    Stumpshot -- why a double bowline instead of a bowline? ..... is your entire rope doubled? Thanks.
    - Robert
    Slowly trying to make a profit in tree work with my neighborhood tree service.
    Thinking I want to become a Certified Arborist.
    www.PoagvilleTreeService.com

  9. #29
    TreeHouser Sponsor treesmith's Avatar
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    I favor a Munter hitch (with 3-4 half hitches), as I often tension by hand as I'm tying off, and it always unties easily.
    "Honor is what no man can give you...and none can take away. Honor is a man's gift to himself."

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  10. #30
    Treehouser Sponsor rfwoody's Avatar
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    Thanks Treesmith. I need to research and try the Munter hitch
    - Robert
    Slowly trying to make a profit in tree work with my neighborhood tree service.
    Thinking I want to become a Certified Arborist.
    www.PoagvilleTreeService.com

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