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Thread: Amsteel Crane Slings

  1. #41
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
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    Is that 5x figure well documented? I would have assumed 1.5 to 2x the labeled rating, but that's a bit much more than I would have expected. For sure you can't afford a failure when craning over property -- buildings, cars, etc. Last week we craned a walnut log over a garage end of a house. Our 50' reach is pretty limiting, but with our knuckling capability, we were able to match the roofline and telescope out as far as possible, then reach the log with a sling and chains. Heaviest things we've lifted have been the chipper (8,000 lb.), a solid plate steel welding table (10,000 lb.) and now this stump/rootball (10-12,000 lb.). Larger items have required chains, as we don't have Amsteel slings sufficiently large for those big items.

  2. #42
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
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    I'm sure Kyle will answer. But I highly doubt crane hardware has only a 1.5 to 2 time safety factor. Five to one seemed possibly low to me?

  3. #43
    TreeHouse Administrator MasterBlaster's Avatar
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    I thought it was more like 10...

  4. #44
    THE CALM ONE!!!! Sponsor squisher's Avatar
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    Then the breaking strength decreases with use and abuse right. Cycles to failure. The harder it's used the more strength it looses or less cycles before failure.

  5. #45
    Dormant hero!! Sponsor sotc's Avatar
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    I think it is 5 times
    Willie
    Southern Oregon Tree Care,LLC
    “Pruning is one of the best things an arborist can do for a tree but one of the worst things we can do to a tree.” Shigo

  6. #46
    Student of the Jedi Sponsor treebilly's Avatar
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    I believe you’re right. 5X for rigging
    -Rich

  7. #47
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    I've always heard 10:1 for textiles, 5:1 for hardware.

    Besides that, I don't think Kyle speaks tech-spec stuff from the lower end.
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

  8. #48
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    In industrial supply, I saw some gear with a double rating. One wll for pulling, one for lifting. With a bit of math, that gives a safety factor of 4 for pulling and 5 for lifting. But that's for hardware.

    what puzzled a while is the tree cabling ropes. The rating is very different than our other ropes for the same diameter. That's because the safety factor is only 2 !

  9. #49
    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    Rigging for industrial applications is 5 to 1 (aka crane slings, straps, beam clamps, chain falls, come alongs, etc). Rigging for life support is 10 to 1, i think logging is 3 to one, as is rigging for equipment tie downs. These are osha mandated safety ratings, and damaged rigging must be removed from service. As far as chain goes, grade 100 or higher is needed for overhead lifting, such as crane service. 70 is usually for equipment tie down, and you cannot use it for crane rigging. The standards to which it is built is different, and that's why.

    If you have multiple slings, you have to take in to consideration the sling angle and attachment. A choker is i believe 60 percent of a straight pull, a basket is double.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Kyle


  10. #50
    General Purpose Sponsor Stumpshot's Avatar
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    Lost a sling today -- or rather, decided on early retirement. It had a nick in it and a few pulled fibers. Time for another one or two new ones to ring in the new year. Besides, we need a choker with more length to go around the circumference of some of these trees we've been facing lately. Today's big hackberry we had to bore cut with a 36" bar on the 395 -- close to 5' dia. at the stump cut.