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Thread: New Engine for splitter

  1. #51
    Treehouser Cobleskill's Avatar
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    Pretty common item at the fleas. Bought several replacements for broken ones. But Amazon is OK too. Flea markets can be fun. I bought 3 pairs of old, good shape American made pliers for $5 this fall. Bough a bunch of differnent kinds. Bargains are easy to find and fun to look. Usually a tool guy with nothing but. Try them lately?

  2. #52
    Call me Bob BlackSmith's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    ˙ǝuılƃıs ʎɯ uı ʇnd oʇ ɹǝʌǝlɔ ƃuıɥʇʎuɐ ɟo ʞuıɥʇ ʇ,uɐɔ I

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    California Hillbilly Sponsor CurSedVoyce's Avatar
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    Yup, those.
    Interesting how a limited gene pool and a limited labor force seem to be so closely related.

  4. #54
    Treehouser Cobleskill's Avatar
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    I think I would drill a hole in a piece of scrap and see how that worked out before I ran it in to a brand new engine block. It might work fine, might gall the shit out of them. Aluminum can gall without much effort.

  5. #55
    Treehouser Sponsor No_Bivy's Avatar
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    . Already a holes in the mounting plate. The are self threading bolts not screws......no center punch needed. The bolts are three sided so to speak.

    anyway.....several you tubes of folks using and impact driver to rattle them in....I was planning on by hand slowly.

    they look similar to what blacksmith posted.........so any tips to putting them in? or just shut up and do it......

    motor here on the 5th
    a society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in

  6. #56
    Rodent Aviator Sponsor Skwerl2's Avatar
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    Run them in by hand and back them up a quarter turn whenever you get too much resistance. Spray some silicone lube in the hole before starting and add more if needed while running the bolts in. They are cutting threads so run it in like you would a tap.
    -Brian

  7. #57
    Treehouser Sponsor No_Bivy's Avatar
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    good suggestions
    a society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in

  8. #58
    Call me Bob BlackSmith's Avatar
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    In a pinch I’ve made a tap out of a spare bolt. Angle grinder and cutoff wheel or hacksaw, cut some grooves in the bolt. Temp tap, harder the bolt the longer it’ll last. Save a trip to town.
    ˙ǝuılƃıs ʎɯ uı ʇnd oʇ ɹǝʌǝlɔ ƃuıɥʇʎuɐ ɟo ʞuıɥʇ ʇ,uɐɔ I

  9. #59
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skwerl2 View Post
    They are cutting threads so run it in like you would a tap.
    Can you expand on this?
    If it looks like I asked a question, but put a period, it's probably a question.
    Don't know why I'm question-mark challenged online. 😀 New Year's Resolution, better proof reading.

  10. #60
    Treehouser Sponsor Tree09's Avatar
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    You take a cutoff wheel, and manually score out the thread so it looks like a tap. You leave the following edge (the side that is going to do the cutting) either straight up and down or just slightly undercut, so it cuts nicely. You then heat the bolt up to red heat at a minimum, then quench it (works best with the higher grade bolts), ideally with some oil, lacking that, water works too but can possibly crack the bolt. You then have a redneck tap. Works with pipe thread too, but only to clean out or straighten messed up threads.

    The reason you use the higher grade bolt you can find is because of the carbon content. The more carbon, the harder you can get it. By heating it up, you are changing the grain structure of the steel, quenching freezes that grain structure. You are actually forming martensite if you have something with a higher carbon content than mild steel.
    Kyle


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