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Thread: ladder safety

  1. #21
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
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    Frans, usually you are not wrong on safety issues...but in this you clearly are imo.
    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  2. #22
    TreeHouse Administrator MasterBlaster's Avatar
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    Standoffs make good sense to me!

  3. #23
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    Ladders freak me out. Over the years i have seen two serious accidents from them. One crippled the guy. He now lives in a wheelchair.

    I guess i just wont trust the guy hanging on the underside. Seen too many guys just let go of stuff when the going got serious

  4. #24
    Woods walker Sponsor Burnham's Avatar
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    That's down to the guys doing the spotting, not the ladder or it's settings. Apportion blame where it is deserved.
    "Confidence is the feeling you sometimes have before you fully understand the situation."

  5. #25
    TreeHouser Sponsor bstewert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by squisher View Post
    How did you get the squirrel out?
    Dropped a rope down overnight. Then went back to screen it off.

    Which type of standoffs would you use on this roof? I see there are many types.

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  6. #26
    Treehouser Sponsor Fiddler's Avatar
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    After 23 years of dealing with ladders of all heights as a roofer, my problem isn't how the bottom is held...it's the use of hands on rails and not the steps. The guy climbing would get fired on my old crew if he climbed like that a second time after being warned. I've had lives saved more than once when a ladder flipped and the climber ended up under the ladder holding on to a step...
    The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese. -Steven Wright

  7. #27
    Acolyte of the short bar Sponsor Bermy's Avatar
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    So Fid, do you mean you should hold the steps when going up?
    Keep smiling, they will wonder what you're up to...

    Originally Posted by woodworkingboy
    It's always better when people get the feeling that they will regret their decision, before they have to regret their decision.

  8. #28
    Treehouser Sponsor SeanKroll's Avatar
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    The extension ladder I typically use is nice and light, and rated for 250 pounds. I could only have a 6 years old hold the ladder for me by standing on it before going above the load rating.

  9. #29
    Treehouser Sponsor Fiddler's Avatar
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    Bermy...up or down holding the steps is safer than rails...rails are there to hold the steps/handles

    Also, whenever possible "three points of contact" when ascending or descending...move one limb at a time.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese. -Steven Wright

  10. #30
    Monkey for Hire Sponsor biggun's Avatar
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    I was always told 1 foot out for every 4 foot height. Or in my case Toe on the bottom and should be able to touch the ladder at arms length.

    As for climbing the ladder, steps are for feet and dog shit and everything else you have trod in. Rails are for hands when ascending and descending.

    Looking at the picture, I would have thought a full man and equipment hanging on the underside would provide similar force to someone day dreaming and footing the ladder on the other side.

    Most footing of ladders I do or climbing the ladders is for hedging jobs. You wouldn't want to be on the underside of the ladder with all the crap falling in you.
    Rich.

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