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Thread: SNIPE

  1. #1
    TreeHouser sierratree's Avatar
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    Default SNIPE

    Anyone have a good pic of a snipe? When do you use one? Is it like a soft dutchman?
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  2. #2
    forestryworks
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    A snipe will influence how the butt of the tree leaves the stump and how close or how far it lands from the stump. From what I understand, it is predominantly (today) used on humboldt undercuts. In the misery whip days in some areas, it was used on the conventional undercut.

    As an example, you can use a narrow than average humboldt, with a steep (I think in Jerry's book he refers to it as obtuse?) snipe. The face closes, holding wood breaks, and the butt rides down the snipe. Hope that makes sense.

    The pros will be along shortly to further elaborate.

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    TreeHouser Jed's Avatar
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    Sorry Boys: No pros yet. Just me for now. I think that that's just a NorCal term, for any diagonal opening whatsoever. Generally, them old-growth guys wld have to knock out a pretty substantial gap in the face to maximize the holding of all that beautiful, but brashy heartwood. Then, I believe, they referred to whatever diagonal cut was used--whether up or down--as the snipe. I cld be wrong.

    Forestryworks: I think that the "obtuse" snipe is when--using a gap--the diagonal is sawn-in much closer to the hinge on one corner than on the other in an attempt to slip the ass end of the log to one particular side of the stump. (Because of better ground for the log.)

    I'd be really interested to hear from Jer about whether he had personally tried that one too often, and what success he might have gotten out of it.

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    Old Schooler Sponsor gf beranek's Avatar
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    For being such a small word volumes can be said about the snipe. As it is called when used in conjunction with the diagonal cut, humboldt style.

    The snipe can be sawn partially into the stump and it can be sawn fully into the stump. It can be sawn shallow in angle and it can be steep in angle. The snipe can provide a square edge for the butt of the tree to break off the stump. and it can provide a ramp for the butt of a tree to slip off of the stump. When sawn off the butt of the tree,, the snipe is referred to as a scarf. And what can work for a snipe can work for a scarf too, but in opposite ways.

    for the most part the snipe is used to get the butt of a tree off the stump and take lead in the fall. And this can make all the difference in saving a tree from breaking in a bad lay. Or more precisely where the butt has a long ways to reach the ground.

    The snipe and scarf can alter the face opening to minor or major degrees. Often very subtlely for the most part, but even when that is the case it can still have pronounced effects in how a tree leaves its stump and lays out. In any case the exact effect that we want from the snipe is always going to be situation dependent and sometimes the true need for it is can be a debatable matter.

    In a nutshell it's mechanics and timing,,, and a good imagination to foresee the possibilities in a trees fall. the mechanics of the felling cut can be understood more easily through demonstrations than by elaborating about it. Because it's all theory so much gets lost in translation.

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    TreeHouser Jed's Avatar
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    O.K.!!! The pros have arrived. I stand gratefully corrected. Thanks Jer.

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    Bamboo Plantation Owner Sponsor Tucker943's Avatar
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    PICS!

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    TreeHouser Sponsor DMc's Avatar
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    TreeHouser Jed's Avatar
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  9. #9
    Dormant hero!! Sponsor sotc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gf beranek View Post
    For being such a small word volumes can be said about the snipe. As it is called when used in conjunction with the diagonal cut, humboldt style.

    The snipe can be sawn partially into the stump and it can be sawn fully into the stump. It can be sawn shallow in angle and it can be steep in angle. The snipe can provide a square edge for the butt of the tree to break off the stump. and it can provide a ramp for the butt of a tree to slip off of the stump. When sawn off the butt of the tree,, the snipe is referred to as a scarf. And what can work for a snipe can work for a scarf too, but in opposite ways.

    for the most part the snipe is used to get the butt of a tree off the stump and take lead in the fall. And this can make all the difference in saving a tree from breaking in a bad lay. Or more precisely where the butt has a long ways to reach the ground.

    The snipe and scarf can alter the face opening to minor or major degrees. Often very subtlely for the most part, but even when that is the case it can still have pronounced effects in how a tree leaves its stump and lays out. In any case the exact effect that we want from the snipe is always going to be situation dependent and sometimes the true need for it is can be a debatable matter.

    In a nutshell it's mechanics and timing,,, and a good imagination to foresee the possibilities in a trees fall. the mechanics of the felling cut can be understood more easily through demonstrations than by elaborating about it. Because it's all theory so much gets lost in translation.
    Exactly, word for word what I was going to say

    Willie
    Southern Oregon Tree Care,LLC
    “Pruning is one of the best things an arborist can do for a tree but one of the worst things we can do to a tree.” Shigo

  10. #10
    TreeHouser sierratree's Avatar
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    i was waiting for someone to get in the bird. touche.
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