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  • Underwor's Avatar
    05-05-2018
    Denatured alcohol will allow you to easily wipe off spruce tar and sterilize you for the next tree!!!!
    116 replies | 3300 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    04-02-2018
    candoarms replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    It's built well, but I think the guy was in a hurry to use it and didn't put much effort into finishing it off properly. It's in dire need of a few details in order to make it operate as it should. The new parts have arrived and now I'm just waiting for some warm weather so that I can go out there to begin putting the finishing touches on it. It's April 2 d and we'll have temps below zero tonight. No warm weather in the forecast for at least 10 days. Tired of this crap. Joel
    1112 replies | 119620 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    04-02-2018
    candoarms replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    This mill will currently handle a log 27" in diameter by 20 feet in length. When I'm done with it, it will handle a log 30" x 20'. I've ordered new roller guides for the blade through Cook's Saw and the new engine with electric start is already here. The bed needs some log dogs, but I'll get those fabricated up very soon. I look forward to using it a whole lot more this summer Raj. Joel
    1112 replies | 119620 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    04-02-2018
    candoarms replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    I purchased this sawmill at auction and brought it home from Pine City, Minnesota. It's a homemade jobbie that needs a bit of engineering and fabrication in order to make it useful, but the majority of the work has been completed. I look forward to posting more photos as the project takes shape over the summer. Joel
    1112 replies | 119620 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    03-11-2018
    I have the Echo PAS-266 system, which comes with many different attachments. I own the articulating hedge trimmer, pole saw, extension, cultivator, weed trimmer, blower, brush cutter, and broom. One engine powers them all. The pole saw is a 10" with 3/8" pitch chain in .050 gauge. I use it nearly every day. Joel
    72 replies | 5527 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    03-11-2018
    We have some friends that live S of Tucson, near Sonoita and Elgin. It is interesting and different country down there.
    72 replies | 3139 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    03-10-2018
    The petrified forest is as you said one of the great visits for a forester. Were through there about 6 years ago. Have the trees grown any since?
    72 replies | 3139 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    03-08-2018
    I purchased a set of the CDs and used them when I studied for my test. Lots of very useful information that will start anyone serious about tree care down the right path. The ISA is an international body, so testing applies to everyone. My set has been passed around quite a few times, but I always end up getting it back. We've started a book sharing club, of sorts, between the arborists in the area and that seems to be a very good way of getting to know each other and to share a cup of coffee once in a while as we meet to test new gear, or talk shop. Joel
    12 replies | 1126 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    02-15-2018
    Yes Sylvia the trees were planted for timber production. They are looking into nut production, but the varieties are not specifically selected for that so prices would be for forest run nuts. All plantings total about 1500-2000 acres trees planted at about 500 per acre (my estimates). Best stands coming up on first pre-commercial thinning (about 6" dbh) in next couple of years. All fields fertilized last year were pruned this fall, it will be interesting to see how they respond this year. Think rest of fields will be fertilized this spring. It is amazing how close the aerial applicator comes spreading urea which is about the same weight as Styrofoam. Will add a picture of line between plots in one field. Second photo is test strips in Harrison, with Cooper in the foreground.
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    02-15-2018
    Sylvia and all, I got distracted from this site for a while. Here are answers to your most recent questions. As far as I can tell they are all from the same source. The trees are from Perdue University research. I visited with 3 of the professors from their forestry department who visited last fall. They had no explanation for sure on the differences, but the one who dealt more with the agronomy side seemed to agree with me that it likely had a lot to do with soil health at time of planting. None of the fields were fertilized in the first couple of years, so they started with what was available in the soil at that time. I have seen several other examples of the phenomena over the years My brother farms a field that had an air strip on it for many years. The area of air strip still has corn that is taller and greener even after 5 years or so in ag production. A site south of Prairie City had tiling work done a year ago that mixed some of the fence row and road ditch soil with the crop land area. There were individual stalks of corn or small clumps in the area last summer that stood up to 2' taller than the rest. Since we know that the genetics of these crops is such that all are normally carbon copies of each other, this seems to show that there were very limited areas of fertility difference. I have photos of work done there this winter and hope to see similar results next summer. If I do I will try to post the images to this site. As you suggested, I think I am going to try to incorporate a couple of buckets of soil from Cooper around the base of a tree or two in Harrison this year. Don't know how long it will take for a change to show, but if it is as quick a the corn field I should see something, even if it is just holding its leaves longer in the fall for a first year response. As they say leaves grow trees. I will attach the soil maps of the sites. Also a deal I wrote up for one of my online soils labs from another site. Photos come from center of 279B soil type
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    01-27-2018
    Bounce, I joined the North Dakota Urban and Community Forestry Association three years ago, after being appointed to the position of Urban Forester here in Cando, North Dakota. Since that time I've been asked to give presentations regarding basic climbing techniques, pruning classes and aerial rescue. This year I've been asked to take part in a community tree inventory program that will place every public tree in our State on a database. Some 80 communities in our State have been inventoried already, but the database is on paper and is not easily updated. The new system will allow us to update inventories on the spot, using our smart phones to access and update the database. When a tree is removed, we can subtract it from the inventory. The same is true when we plant new trees. Following the classes that I'll be taking this coming week I'll be asked to help many communities implement this new tree inventory system. It will aid us tremendously if and when the Emerald Ash Borer arrives in North Dakota. We don't expect that it will be too long from now, because it's already been positively identified in Winnipeg, Manitoba...about 60 miles from our border. I'll soon be traveling across the State to make presentations at city council meetings in many small towns here in North Dakota. My goal is get every community to take part in the tree inventory program and to make the database available to all city personnel, urban foresters, shade tree committees, etc. Joel
    14 replies | 744 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    01-14-2018
    I am with Butch. Very happy with VA. Almost glad to have been drafted.
    59 replies | 2194 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-29-2017
    I operate a tree and landscaping business here in North Dakota. Back in April I purchased a stump grinder. One of my first calls of the Spring was for stump grinding service. I showed up and took out the stump. The price was 120 bucks. We started talking and the customer decided that he'd like to have a patio installed. Then he decided that he wanted to take a hill out of his yard and have the entire yard tilled up and reseeded. Next came his neighbor to ask about a patio. Then came his friend to ask about a patio. The stump grinder was paid for with just one job. I love my customers. Can't wait until Spring. Joel
    93 replies | 2542 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-27-2017
    Promise not to laugh....... I purchased a small walk-behind tiller at an auction. Got it cheap cheap...motor was shot. OK....I went to Harbor Freight and bought a Predator 6.5 horse engine. Bolted right up in place of the old Briggs. No changes to be made. No problem replacing belts and pulleys. Everything fits perfect. The HarborFraud engine starts on the second pull. Runs perfectly every single time. No problems at all. I'll buy another one for my sawmill when I get to that project next spring, but I'll buy the larger 13 horse. 99 bucks for the engine, plus 8 bucks shipping. Joel
    72 replies | 1977 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    12-27-2017
    candoarms replied to a thread Weird contraptions in Odds and Ends
    I just love this one. Joel
    33 replies | 3447 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-29-2017
    candoarms replied to a thread Three Word Story in Odds and Ends
    I fixed it.
    359 replies | 8228 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-29-2017
    candoarms replied to a thread Duratech chippers?? in Gear Forum
    Here's a link to the Duratech TC-12 chipper. http://www.duratechindustries.net/dt/TC12.html Joel
    12 replies | 580 view(s)
  • candoarms's Avatar
    11-29-2017
    candoarms replied to a thread Duratech chippers?? in Gear Forum
    Duratech chippers are manufactured in Jamestown, North Dakota, at Haybuster's former manufacturing facility Duratech is located 120 miles from me. I've been to the plant and I've seen the TC-12 chipper in action. It's a good machine. I especially like the sensor in the infeed chute that detects the size of the incoming log and then opens the infeed wheels to the proper height to accept the incoming material. Hope this helps. Joel
    12 replies | 580 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    11-07-2017
    Good to hear from you Sylvia. All sites were ripped to about 3? to mark rows prior to planting. Cropping had been done for at least 15+ years with average yield for the area. All treatments following planting are identical. Only difference is cropped planting is 2 years older. Nancy says hi!
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-25-2017
    Managed the same. In row weed control done same day Cooper was planted into pasture in 2011. Harrison in 2009 in corn/soybean ground. All trees on 7’ centers in 12’ rows. Only fertilizer was this past spring with 100#N. Urea About 1 mile north and 1 mile east of Aledo IL. On southwest corner
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-24-2017
    No Jim. Just started working with company this spring. Just noticed a strong relationship between former crop land and pasture.
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-24-2017
    Good to hear from you Dave. I am thinking that the younger field got a big boost from N supplied by micro organisms in the soil that was in pasture, which was not available in the cropped land since regular fertilizing had eliminated the need for these organisms to exist in sufficient numbers to react without the annual dose of nitrates and anhydrous ammonia. The younger field has had an extra month and a half or two months growth due to early leaf fall on the older site. This is my first year observing these fields, so I do not know if this has been an annual event although I suspect it has. Temp is about 45 hear today. I miss the Dakotas where this would just be a light jacket day and not a winter coat day. Dang humidity!!!!
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-23-2017
    Here is the explanation of Haney Test. It won't let me attach a .docx file. Look up at wardlab.com
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    10-23-2017
    As a few of you may know, I retired from the urban forestry side of things a couple of times and at age 70 decided to do what I originally studied in college in the 60's. I work for a forest management company that has several walnut plantations here in Illinois. It is interesting trying to recall what you learned that long ago and then filed away. This thread is a spin off from Jim and Dave's highly popular Sustainable Ag discussion. It deals with two fields, side by side, same soil type and fertilization regimen (100#N - 25#P aerial applied this past spring). The differences are that one was planted in 2009, the other in 2011 (hint: reverse the fields based on your first inclination), and one was in standard corn soybean crop rotation prior to planting while the other was a pasture with Osage Orange and multiflora rose cover that was bulldozed prior to planting. I had a Haney Soil Health evaluation done with samples taken from the grass area you can see in the two side by side photos. I did this to be sure that chemical applications in the tree rows and such would have less effect (I think). In the results, Cooper is the best looking site. I will also include a document on interpreting these tests. What do you think????
    16 replies | 1358 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    08-24-2017
    Had the chance 2 weeks ago to visit my son in Alexandria, MN. They just bought a house and my grand daughter had a climbing tree she was anxious to show me. I took my gear and got in a climb and minor prune for my 51st year, in my 70th year. Also got son, daughter-in-law and both girls(8 and 10) in the tree for a while. Think we have 3 generations of climbers in the family now, but not all as a profession, yet! Will keep at it as long as I can and it is fun.
    249 replies | 14033 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    06-02-2017
    Underwor replied to a thread Frans in Odds and Ends
    Last time we met was in a Redwood tree. Helped with my bucket list. Hopefully he will show up again soon.
    37 replies | 2107 view(s)
  • Underwor's Avatar
    05-27-2017
    Just completed 50 years, only climbed a couple of times last year, none yet this year, but my daughter does have a good size hanger in her silver maple. I may get 51 years in the book soon. I still enjoy it, but the little stroke slowed me down last August. Think I have fully recovered except for being in good shape. By the way, I will turn 70 on July 1st.
    249 replies | 14033 view(s)
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About Underwor

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Date of Birth
July 1, 1947 (71)
About Underwor
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Avon, IL
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Retired, Park District Crew Leader, Online College instructor/Arborist

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Bob Underwood
Associate Professor Dakota College at Bottineau - Online
Underwood and Associates - Consultant and Speaker
Avon, IL

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