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  • Tree09's Avatar
    35 Minutes Ago
    Holy crap nice truck man, material handling for the win!
    8041 replies | 501445 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Did you just do that? Ouch man!!!!!
    8457 replies | 160317 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    That is cool!!!!!
    10160 replies | 585673 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread In The News... in Odds and Ends
    Modifying our genes is eugenics. Can we not start that again plz, k thx. We already did the whole ww2 thing once, non eugenics won.
    6644 replies | 253638 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    :thumbup:
    8457 replies | 160317 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    I click on the picture icon, choose file, then upload.
    8457 replies | 160317 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    :lol:
    4632 replies | 78096 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    They are the same technology, as far as i know the exact same machine. Either will perform similarly, i think the thunderbolt is slightly more adjustable. However this is less important than you think, rod angle and manipulation is more important. When welding pipeline, you have a remote in the ditch with you, which your helper adjusts on the fly to help react to conditions as you go. While this would seem necessary, it's not, it's for speed. On building trade jobs, you string out a few hundred feet of lead, ground the machine to the closest steel i beam, and set your heat on about what you think you need. Then you go and weld with it set at that heat all day, with different rods, thicknesses, and positions. You use rod angle, arc length, and other tricks to achieve the same thing. If you need more heat, you angle the rod slightly towards the direction of travel, if you need less you angle it back towards the puddle. A tight arc will increase the amperage, but will lower the voltage, leading to less heat spread out. This will allow more control, because metal flows to where the heat is. Really, that simple fact is welding in a nutshell. Miller and Lincoln are the two main welding manufacturers anymore. Esab is up and coming, arcon is the old powcon, airco have disappeared (Miller bought then?), and Hobart is now Miller (They used to be a very viable alternative). Miller is usually seen in shop settings and cheap engine drives. They are lacking in arc quality and stability compared to comparable Lincolns, although they are closing the gap. Miller is known to push the envelope of technology, sometimes before they have perfected what they are trying to do. Lincoln seems to get it perfect before they release it, which means Miller will introduce something and then Lincoln will improve it. If my prejudices haven't made it clear, pipe welders are very particular :lol: Most welders i know will take a Lincoln anything over a Miller, but will do xray work with whatever you give them. In the end they are both reliable machines, kinda a ford Chevy thing (until you start talking downhill machines). In pipeline (downhill) until quite recently if you showed up with a Miller the inspector wouldn't even let you test. Even now there are only 1 or 2 Miller machines they will allow on most ROWs. Basically either machine will serve you well bud. If i had a choice, i would go with the Lincoln.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Liability in The House Of Splice!
    I hear you, but my contention is this: splicing has been part of the rigging trade since it started. Part of every rigging task is inspecting and choosing proper rigging, so anytime something goes wrong it's supposed to be on the guy doing the actual rigging, unless the rigging manufacturer could be blamed due to negligence or something similar. If you are unable to eye splice hollow braid, you probably don't need to be even tying your shoes, but if someone makes you some rigging you use it, you have to inspect it and declare it safe for use before you can begin. The rigging trade, like most trades, has been dumbed down over the years to allow a less skilled and less paid individual to do it. At some point standing up to idiocracy needs to happen.
    20 replies | 538 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    It's an old century one, an off brand but we're as virtually good buzzboxes back in the day (when that was made). It will be all copper and suit your needs just fine. Price is about right too, so yes especially if it comes with the leads. It should pretty much last forever. You must be pretty rural to have nothing closer, but that is what it is i guess.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Excellent work Gary, your extensive work experience ranging from trees, diving, and crane work, (and a bunch more I'm probably not even aware of!) is both humbling and inspiring. Thank you for sharing that. Great quick thinking and figuring it out with what you had to get it done.
    191 replies | 7649 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I wanted to show some cribbing techniques that I've found helpful, and figured i would put this here in this thread because technically cribbing is a form of rigging. Working pipeline has shown me the value of knowing this stuff (didn't have a clue about it earlier), and is so handy i think just about everyone can find a use for it. Pipelines are built above ground next to the trench they are installed in, and timber cribbing is the traditional way they are raised to enable welding the bottom. It is cheap, sturdy, and infinitely adjustable to the situation at hand, and I've used it many times since for levelling or supporting things. This is very useful when working on equipment or welding or timber fabrications. There are three different techniques that I'm aware of and use, the box crib, the crotch, and the slide. The box crib is used in all of them, and is the basic technique. It is simply stacking timbers in an alternating form, much like Lincoln logs. Friction holds everything in place. A crotch is used to keep things from rolling, and consists of timbers placed on an angle to form a v shape which keeps things from rolling. A slide is when an extra timber is used to form a ramp, which allows another skid to be slid up or down the ramp, changing the height. By using this we can level long sections just like if we had a jackstand. The pictures I've decided to use show multiple techniques used together to achieve what they needed to. The first one is a box skid with a crotch. You can adjust the height slightly by lifting the crotch skid and sliding the cross skid that it sits on closer to the pipe. You can level perpendicular to the length too, to get an i beam or similar level by doing just one side. You are fixed in height using a box or crotch skid, so that is what is usually used to start. A slide is used to level, so it's used secondly. This next picture is fuzzy, but you can see how they accommodated the cross slope by forming a slide at the bottom, so the rest of the box skid is level. They then used stacked skids for the the pipe to sit on (using a crotch) making it stronger so it isn't relying on one skid to not bend. This is how i prefer to build a slide, the box skid is simply the foundation and the gives the desired height. If i need slightly more i stack 2 skids on top, higher yet i build the box higher first. This is simplest way and strongest way to build a slide. Some prefer to use wedges from ripped skids to form the slope of the slide, which is fine too, but the thicker whole skid is stronger and doesnt rely on perfect alignment to stay in place.
    191 replies | 7649 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    :lol:
    123 replies | 7930 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Way nicer setup than i got man, nice!!
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Chipper question... in Chainsaws!
    Yup. They make actual stethoscope kinds too, and are cheap enough to justify having. Good for all sorts of diagnosing tasks.
    68 replies | 1231 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Welcome to the house :)
    53 replies | 1413 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Yeah that's gotta be dangerous as hell for the pilot.
    10160 replies | 585673 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Hahahahahahahahaha
    4847 replies | 128265 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Lol i think everyone who has to work for a living is like that. Hell anymore i feel like just working is hard enough. As my friend says tho, it's just like eating an elephant, just one bite at a time. I'm in it for the long grind, that's how i get stuff done now.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread In The News... in Odds and Ends
    Lol i enjoyed it thoroughly Dave!
    6644 replies | 253638 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    A thunderbolt will do you fine and will last forever. Please just ignore inverters, unless you want to spend some money to get a decent one and aren't against spending more down the road when it breaks. They look good on paper and are fairly reliable (depending on the brand), but not to the level that the simpler machines are. If you are getting an inverter, make sure to get a Lincoln or Miller, because their reputation is everything to them and they are more inclined to make a quality product and be around long enough to service it. You will hear about everlast and other off brands, but for my money i want a machine from a welding manufacturer that has been around forever, can supply parts, and can do the work if need be.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I hear you, most of my projects and plans take years to come to fruition. The difference between the machines is how the welding current is generated. A transformer machine will use a... transformer to reduce the voltage and increase the amperage, and then on a dc machine will use diodes to rectify the ac to a dc only output. Since it is directly using line power, it operates at 60 Hz, and if we look at the arc on a scope, it will have little humps in it. An inverter will act similarly, but will bump the hertz up to 30000, then convert it to dc, so it has much smaller humps. Because of the switching that occurs with an inverter, the voltage is usually even lower when actually welding (and usually has less slope on the volt amp curve), and arc quality on cellulose rods suffers (6010,11). However, since most welding machines are bought for construction, and most construction codes use 7018 and tig for root passes in pipe, inverters are very popular because they do both of these just fine. A generator makes a ripple free dc current, and has the ability to adjust both the voltage and slope of the arc curve, so will actually weld the best by a long shot. Current very high end inverters are approaching the arc characteristics of a generator, but the machines are very expensive and at the end of the day rely on circuit boards to do what the other machines do naturally (with robust parts vs delicate computer parts). There are also differences in the generator welders, but you are getting to splitting hairs to most people. Welding downhill pipe is about the only industry that really cares at that point, because they are owned by the actual welders themselves and arc characteristics can make or break you when doing xray work downhill. Everyone has their preferences and economic realities, so like everything else in life there are trade-offs.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    As far as running leads, sitting outside doesn't ruin them, especially if you can shield them from sunlight a bit.. You can even run them next to the air conditioner or another hole and even foam them. You can also leave them coiled up inside, and have enough length to simply plug them and then close the door on them. You are going to want tweco or dinse style quick connects (kioke quick connects on a cutting torch are the way to go too), that way if you get more lead in the future you can simply add it like another extension cord. You can swap stingers, grounds etc, and it makes your life way easier. A shop machine will be just fine as well, but if you do get a generator style welder at a good price it will have a much better arc. By generator style i am not referring to an engine drive, I'm referring to a dc generator welder. They have large brushes which transfer the power, and because of their construction offer a true drooping arc curve. The other kinds are inverters and transformers, and all three could be used for an engine drive machine. A lincwelder 225, Lincoln sa whatever, sae whatever, or an torpedo type machine are all dc generators. They will have a dramatically better arc, and excel in out of position work. If that particular Miller is in fact a dc generator, it might be worth closer examination (the point I'm trying to make). But if you really would prefer a shop machine, that will be ok too. Edit: yes the mg is the electric driven generator style, aka torpedo. Please please please ignore the marketing and other bullshit involving welding and welding machines, facts are facts and you will not find any in their ads or affiliated sponsors (YouTube etc). The people who actually know and understand the difference are usually highly trained tradesmen, and they don't care what sells, only what they have to use. This is why you seldom hear what I'm saying, and that is that the machine manufactures are trying to sell technology rather then quality.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Eh, it is an engine drive welder, which will always cost more because there's more to it and is more versatile. I paid 350 for a similar one, a Lincoln lincwelder 225, but bought it off a close friend who sold it cheap to me because he knew i would enjoy it and needed it atm. If it is a brushed generator type, it would be worth that. If push came to shove you could repower it without too much effort. A dc generator style welder really does weld stick that much smoother, and your learning curve will be much shorter because of it. With the "gears" (course adjustment taps) and the fine adjustment you can dial in exactly what arc characteristics you need, and can go from a dry driving arc for out of position work to a wet soft arc for heavy deposition fabrication work. Until you actually weld with one you can't understand the difference, but it's there and makes life much easier. This is why Lincoln used to make electric motor powered generator style welding machines. They would literally use an electric motor to spin a generator, in what is about the lowest efficiency use of electricity aside from the electric chair. But ignoring efficiency, the arc is that much better so it was worth it. To this day, no inverter or transformer can match it.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Poll , Gibbs Ascenders in Gear Forum
    A friction hitch works great, but a rope grab doesn't care about sap at all. Like i said, you have absolutely nothing to learn about climbing from me at all. If you have gone this long using a rope lanyard, i highly doubt you will improve by using a wire core, let alone one with a grab. We all have our preferences, but if you ever find yourself in nothing but sap and/or are forced to work a stem a bunch, they really are pretty sweet. I've seen your YouTube videos, and by my observations you are on the verge of flying anyways, so spend your time perfecting that and you won't need a lanyard at all :lol:
    36 replies | 747 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    :thumbup: just keep hunting, you'll find one.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Tree09 replied to a thread Poll , Gibbs Ascenders in Gear Forum
    Kevin, you are a million times the climber i am or will ever dream to be, but wire core fliplines are awesome on a stem.
    36 replies | 747 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Glad you got what you wanted for it. Sorry we didn't live up to your standards of free classifieds... :lol:
    39 replies | 856 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    If it's close...ish and under 300 i would take a look. See if you can get the guy to send you a pic of the front, it might be a brushed generator style, which will have the best arc (compared to a transformer style). I have a small Lincoln that is roughly the same size and shape, actually welds really nicely. You can put it outside, toss a grill cover over it when you aren't using it, and just run your leads under the door. The ability to be mobile will prove to be quite beneficial, and will likely be cheaper to run than a plug in type. You will definitely notice your bill going up when you are running that kind of equipment.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Oooooooooooooooo
    6716 replies | 364304 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    :lol:
    4847 replies | 128265 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Holy crap you have a lot of clamps!!!! The good kind too!
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    It's just an adjustable friction saver right? Or am i missing something? If the hang up was for the stiffness part, why not just use a wire core lanyard to do the same thing?
    9 replies | 316 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    :lol:
    4847 replies | 128265 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I would like one, but haven't broken down and gotten one yet. I would rather have a large bandsaw myself. Till then I get by just fine with a torch and some cutoff wheels. A portaband is nice too.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Yeah forget about those air die grinders with 3" cutoff wheels, they are for muffler work where you can't reach the backside. You need at least one decent grinder, preferably a 6." 4.5" are common, but they are lacking in about everything, and you will spend way more on wheels because you have to change them out all the time. I definitely prefer ones with a trigger that you hold down to operate, they are safer because they force you to use both hands on them and the trigger acts as a deadman switch. The switched ones will always be shutting off on you as they get older, and this will cause you to send one into orbit :/: When using cutoff wheels (or really anything on a grinder), make sure the sparks are shooting to you (basically don't backchain with one lol). This is because if/ when it gets in a bind, it will then throw the grinder away from you as opposed to ramming into your gut, face, balls, etc. As you use more and more powerful grinders that becomes more and more important, i have some painful and embarrassing stories learning that. An 9" air grinder caught me in the balls (sanding pad causing impact not cutting thank God) once early in my career, and i spent what seemed like an hour coughing and rolling in grinding dust before i could move around again. Almost cut a tendon in my knee with a cutoff wheel getting in a bind (very tight spot), and broke a finger when a wire wheel caught. Having said that i still prefer to use one without a guard, but i can't suggest that to others. I typically will get the metabo original slicer wheels if I'm buying them for me, you can get them for a little over a buck a wheel on Amazon or the like. A 6" one is going to cut as much as 3 or so 4.5" wheels. When using them, score your line, then go back and forth lightly over the material keeping the minimum amount of wheel buried as possible. This will be the fastest cut, and will use the least amount of wheel to do so. Try to avoid burying the wheel in the material, this just wears the sides down and bogs down the grinder. With a 6" wheel you should be able to cut at least 12 inches in 1/4 plate. Only bust out the cutting torch when you are at least 1/4" thick and have a bunch of cuts to do, cutting wheels are often cheaper and quicker. I know guys that will use cutoff wheels on 6" sch 40 pipe on down, Im definitely on 4" on down.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
  • Tree09's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Very. I'm not even close to being that proficient in gas.
    291 replies | 9641 view(s)
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About Tree09

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Date of Birth
August 1, 1982 (36)
About Tree09
Biography:
Name is kyle. Steamfitter in peoria il, and own my own small tree service. Married with a daughter, son, cat and a dog.
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Peoria il
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Sailing, drinking, building stuff, playing guitar, and other random things.
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Steamfitter and tree service

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