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  • Weaves's Avatar
    06-10-2018
    It was my full time job for quite awhile. Actually started doing tree work to give me another income stream during downtime from diving. Other the years it's changed from diving being the main job to tree work taking over. There was a fun period in the middle where I was getting loads of contract climbing work interspersed with some interesting diving work. Now I've not dived for nearly 2 years, been concentrating on building up a tree service business as we have had our first kid and I don't want to have to travel so much for work now. That being said I've just got my dive medical back, always good if I can squeeze in some local diving work here and there. Dive Team sounds good fun, always liked doing recovery dives and searches. Sometimes find some good stuff other than what you are looking for. Some of the other stuff you end up doing can be pretty tedious...we used to joke that if you were doing some of the jobs on dry land you'd be lucky to get minimum wage for it.
    39 replies | 3369 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    06-10-2018
    We managed to get our deployment of the surface supply gear pretty quick, managed to get the pack up at the end of the job even quicker. We mostly run all the gear out of a 7.5ton box body van. Once it's out then the van works as the supervisors office. If we can't drive close enough, and we use 100m umbilicals with the airline comms and power cable in it so we have a decentish range, then we have to strip everything out and then rebuild it closer to the job. It can be a bit of a ball ache tbh. Surface supply is definitely a more luxurious way of diving though, especially with hot water suits. More snagging hazards with it though, definitely.
    39 replies | 3369 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    06-09-2018
    That's cool, makes me wish I'd taken more photos over the years. We used to do a lot of work on military vessels, they tend to frown on you taking pics around their stuff. Do you guys still dive a lot of construction on scuba? HSE cracked down on it here quite a few years ago. Nearly everything is done on surface supply these days. Good side is the extra safety, bad side is the amount of (heavy) kit we have to get to the sites.
    39 replies | 3369 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    06-09-2018
    Is the Dive Team a volunteer service? Sounds interesting, that sort of thing is done by the Police service here. I knew an old police diver years ago, had some stories of some of the searches he'd done. Worst one I can remember was about going down a pipe, either sewer or a culvert-can't remember, that got tighter and tighter until he was inching in by wriggling his shoulders. Think it was looking for a gun.
    39 replies | 3369 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    06-09-2018
    Interesting thread. I got into Arb work after working in commercial diving for about 8yrs, cool to see someone having a similar experience. Did you get into the diving work through recreational diving or was commercial diving something you'd done in the past Gary?
    39 replies | 3369 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    01-26-2018
    Weaves replied to a thread Spiderjack 3 in Climbing Forum
    I've been using a Spiderjack 2 for about 3 years now. When I was getting used to it I would always push the wooden brake on tight with my thumb before pressing down on the release lever. As long as you have the right cam in it ( the rope diameters are marked on the cams), then the brake should hold you steady on the rope with the release lever fully released. Then you can control the speed of the descent with the wooden brake. Once you get used to the hand action it becomes quite natural and smooth. It just takes a bit of practice and obviously it's a good idea to go low and slow at first. With a good pulley saver I've found it a really good labour saving device, if I go back to the old hitch climber for any reason I feel noticeably tired in the shoulders at the end of the day. The other thing I would say is that the better you get with the brake, the longer the cams will last. Hope that helps a bit.
    14 replies | 1016 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    10-29-2017
    Great video. It's awesome when you can do big chunks and the ground gets closer in leaps and bounds. As does a cold beer and the paycheck :D
    44 replies | 2219 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    10-28-2017
    Downloaded this awhile ago. Some good explanations/diagrams here.
    71 replies | 7299 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    05-05-2017
    Weaves replied to a thread Dangerous species in Climbing Forum
    Lombardy Poplar cos I don't trust em, Monkey puzzles cos of the relentless spikiness and London Planes during the summer cos I need a dust mask to cope with the allergic reaction is get.
    68 replies | 3118 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    11-29-2016
    Weaves replied to a thread one handed saw use in Chainsaws!
    Yeah I liked it out there. Wouldn't have minded another trip this year but life is a bit busy here. I don't think taking off for a few months would be approved of this time!
    322 replies | 24113 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    11-29-2016
    Weaves replied to a thread one handed saw use in Chainsaws!
    Alright Rich, Doug Baylin at Ekorn Trepleie.
    322 replies | 24113 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    11-29-2016
    Weaves replied to a thread one handed saw use in Chainsaws!
    Yeah Ben I am. Have to admit I've commented on the same thread there too. Got two unexpected days off and been bored.
    322 replies | 24113 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    11-29-2016
    Weaves replied to a thread one handed saw use in Chainsaws!
    Ta guys. Have to change that now though, back in the South West of the UK these days.
    322 replies | 24113 view(s)
  • Weaves's Avatar
    11-29-2016
    Weaves replied to a thread one handed saw use in Chainsaws!
    Hi, first post here. I normally just sorta lurk around. Anyway, thanks for the vids Reg.A bit like Ben above, I do and have done a fair amount of street tree reductions and re-pollard's and have done a lot of cut and chuck. I think everyone who has done such work commercially will have. Not something to be done flippantly though, always with a solid stance and a focus on where the tip of the bar is and where the direction of travel of the saw will be. If I can't get a good position to do it then I'll use a handsaw. One handing is definitely faster and the money per tree on a lot of these contracts is often low, so there's always pressure to do a lot in a day. Perhaps without that pressure it could be avoided? I wouldn't want to see new climbers doing it though, I think it takes experience and good control of the saw.
    322 replies | 24113 view(s)
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About Weaves

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About Weaves
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South West UK
Occupation:
Climber/Arborist

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