• murphy4trees's Avatar
    17 Hours Ago
    Been thinking about your post Stig.. Great info.. got my wheels turning...
    340 replies | 8875 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    WOW. I hadn't thought about that... Wind resistance seems like it could effect the roll of a top, however this one looks like it starts turning very early before there is enough speed for wind resistance to be much of a factor. I definitely effects the way the limbs fall, making the tips float and the buts drop, but I think there is a better explanation for the pine top.. Thanks for that thought... worthy of consideration... Anyone else have a suggestion???
    340 replies | 8875 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Me too.. I need to get out and see more of the world... I'll keep it on the bucket list and be happy to pay my own ticket when the time comes... Appreciate the info... more of a curiosity though as you rightly say its a much different world than residential arb work. Rolling seems like a very good strategy... better to set it up to roll during the fall than fighting it after the tree gets hung up. the risk of hang ups is something we almsot never face in suburban backyards..... I've seen large tops roll 90 to 180 degrees during the drop and haven't figured out exactly why... I thought I had figured it out after the top of this pine tree spun 180 degrees before hitting the ground... https://youtu.be/7Y5_bGt-sL4?t=678, but never experimented with it enough to remember exactly what caused it. Notice in this video at 13:21 you can see the notch pointing straight up in the air, when it should be pointing down.. and you can see the top roll or spin during the fall.. clearly spun 180 degrees during the fall.... One thing for sure that is required is a very narrow notch so the piece has time to roll after the hinge breaks.... I was also wondering if the way the pull line was wrapped might have torqued the top to make it spin. The side of the hinge that rolled back, let go first and was clearly the side that held the least.... another mystery to be solved .. 35 years later and still love teasing out every bit of knowledge possible.. the level of the back cut certainly may have something to do with it. I was thinking if it would be done reliably it could be used to spin a side leaning limb out of the way during a fall.... would be a nice trick to have in the bag, though rarely needed...
    340 replies | 8875 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    the video is a little deceptive... the back of the hinge was preset by the low undercut, which appears as a kerf from the camera's view. I thought the tree was going to have enough front lean to trip the fall when I made that (low backcut on the tension side) but it didn't move, and I didn't want to thin that side of the hinge out any more, so needed to take more off the higher back cut to get it to trip. Looks like I was plunging a bit to thin out the center of the hinge from the higher (compression side) back cut, which was all she needed to move... There was no bypass from the higher cut being made in the video and the low back cut (seen as a kerf cut), so the lower plunged back cut on the tension side defined the back of the hinge on the tension side... (guessing Stig meant that, but just mis-wrote it) don't feel bad if you're a little confused. I actually had to watch it in slow motion a few times to figure out what happened, and I was there the first time...
    18 replies | 290 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    Wild! Do you know what that's called, Butch. The mechanizum. There's got to be a name for it.
    4083 replies | 57197 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    I would like to try the triple hinge or maybe back it off to a double hinge, and will probably put in a double kerf between the hinges when I do, but I honestly haven't had much of a chance to do so lately... I've been waiting since 2010 for the right tree to try the staggered back cut on, and never really got a grasp of the Wizzy though I remember the thread here went into a good bit of detail, explanation and illustration... If we had enough times to experiment we might be able to say what works better, how the cuts should be adjusted based on tree species, size, lean etc. or maybe find that certain cuts work better in certain scenarios... I don't think I'll ever have enough chance to experiment with it enough to come to reliable conclusions... maybe with all the ash trees dying I'll get a chance to experiment... I will say that the locust tree here was a monster, big and heavy leaning close to 45 degrees.. https://youtu.be/XI57_nTRkd0?t=96 . I would not have expected any cut to slow it down or turn it, once it started moving. So that reflects well on the staggered back cut, but with locust being such a strong hinging wood, perhaps the triple hinge could have been just as effective... WE MAY NEVER KNOW FOR SURE! But if those that drop trees all day every day (Stig) experiment with it, and are generous enough to share their findings, we may glean some new understandings... Looking forward to it!
    18 replies | 290 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    3 Days Ago
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9MLYxZPaFDo" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe> There is very little explanation of the thinking behind this cut in the video, so please take the time to read this description if you have an interest in expanding your bag of tricks in tree falling. Staggered Backcut refers to splitting the back cut into two different cuts at two different heights to fight a heavy side lean. The backcut on the side of the lean is cut at level or slightly above level with the face cut, per standard practices. The backcut on the side away from the lean is cut BELOW the height of the face cut. This gives the hinge fibers on the "low cut" side MUCH more holding ability. The differential in height can be adjusted according to the species and amount of side lean. This Norway maple had very heavy side lean and a good bit of front lean. The drop zone was fairly tight between the pool and the shrubbery beds along the fence line. The tree could make the lay if the huge side lean could be overcome. Norway maple is a poor hinging species, so any type of standard hinge, tapered or otherwise would not be trusted. Other options included setting up a retainer line as shown in this video: https://youtu.be/4HRVsoM9bxc , but that would have required a good bit of time to set up. And I wanted to see if how well the staggered back cut could hold a poor hinging wood like Norway maple, in a relatively low risk scenario (only the shrubs, the fence, and my pride and reputation were at risk) . The hinge held well enough that there was NO DAMAGE to the shrubs with almost no room to spare. SO this was a successful experiment. And since this is only the second time I have tries this cut, more experimentation is needed to fully understand its limitations. The first time I tried the staggered back cut was in 2010 by making a similar cut on a large front leaning locust in this video. https://youtu.be/XI57_nTRkd0?t=96 The locust in this cited video had a huge front lean and yet was pulled significantly left by hinge fibers on the left side of the hinge which held against the front lean because the back cut on the left side of the hinge. I was surprised at the time to see how far to the left and how slowly the tree went due to the staggered backcut. A close study of the video showed without a doubt that the fibers on the left side of the hinge from the low back cut held powerfully enough to slow and turn the tree. In the case of the Norway maple, I was just trying to get it to the lay without losing it to the side weight and NOT trying to "turn" the tree.
    18 replies | 290 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    That and good heat. Grand fir as a comparison doesnt produce so much heat.
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Firewood still a big thing here. And Douglas fir the most sought after
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    Thanks all. I should mention, perfect weather made all the difference. Its funny, you notice more that your in a tall tree when its windy Cory, 3-400 id guess for the big ones. 5ft 16 in. They are sold already $300, buyer collects as is. Pete, the very fine dust from old doug fir bark should not be ingested. Soon as your saw passes through it theres a plume. That gnarly characteristic is typical in the veteran's. Worse nearer the bottom. Not so much in anything less than 100 years old. The rings on this one suggested it was about 230. Yes Gary, I set it that way for the extra support.
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    4 Days Ago
    was he trying to turn or roll the tre by leaving that chunk in the right side of the face cut??? Always hard to tell from video if the tree actually turned
    340 replies | 8875 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I'd be a wuped pup the next morning. Best to take the extra time to get done in one day. Be worse to have to go up on the second day. Speaking of pitch. Windchecks in old-growth fir can hold 10- 20 gallons of pitch. Once you vent a check to the atmosphere it can suck air, gurgle and pour out pitch for an hour, and there's not much else you can do until it's done. Nasty. I've always like the smell of it though.
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Perfect fell, full limb and buck. Next.
    340 replies | 8875 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Thanks for posting that, Johnny. Crack me up.
    4419 replies | 106328 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    That was a long day in a tree. My hat's off to ya, Reg. And thank you for taking the little extra time to record it. Beautiful.
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Yeah I went back in my own yesterday to cut and clean up. Truck load of sawdust but the logs stayed. That was the deal. He can sell the wood.
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    5 maybe 6 kids ? tree biz, YouTube and his saddle probably keeping him occupied
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I dont have particular big or tough hands, quite the opposite. I just hate the feeing of gloves. Thanks
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Thanks Johnny. No, we didn't know there was even a cable up there
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • RegC's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I put out some 'before' pics of this tree on another thread just recently. All went pretty well....just a lot of chunking down through the afternoon. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eNly8bkbVIQ" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    75 replies | 1122 view(s)
  • gf beranek's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    No kidding.
    4419 replies | 106328 view(s)
  • murphy4trees's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    OUCH!!!! You're are hurting yourself more than you know... It's much easier to lower a high bid than raise a low bid... Job is probably worth $2K, maybe more... if you do tree owrk at half price, its a hobby... if you do it near 25% of the market cost, its INSANE!!!! This is HARD DANGEROUS work ... respect the trees and the work... gross underbidding is very damaging.. you can fix it though.. very easily..next time you are getting ready to give a price DOUBLE it!
    18 replies | 239 view(s)
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About August Hunicke

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About August Hunicke
Biography:
Born (1968) and raised in the Alaskan bush. No power, no running water my entire childhood. We lived almost entirely off the land, eating salmon and moose meat primarily. Bought rice, beans, and wheat in large sacks periodically. My father was originally from Southern California but after Vietnam wasn't welcomed home. He made his own home with my beautiful mother in Hatcher Pass Alaska, far from stores and cars and highways. He built the log cabin I was born in. He delivered me and my brothers and sisters there and raised us up working hard. He read us the bible and taught us about God. I'm not ashamed of it nor do I think I have to plead with anyone to "get saved." Growing up, I was embarrassed at times by where we lived and thought we were poor because we didn't have light switches and drive a k car. Now I know we were rich. Rich in substance and heart and capability. I thought I was lazy as a child because I didn't look forward to all the hard work. I found out later when I entered the work force in the tree and also commercial fishing industries that I was not lazy but in fact stood out as a hard worker. I live in Oregon now, 2 miles from my now civilized parents (light switches and all) because they moved here. I have a beautiful wife and little ones. I want them to be close to my parents. Home is wherever my parents go and I intend to carry on the legacy of love of my father until I die in all my relationships, including here at the Tree House.
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Oregon
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Hunting, fishing, tree wrecking, writing, working with video.
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Tree Service Owner

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