• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    I did wear my saddle and was connected to the bucket with my 26' rope. The access range was more for horizontal reach than height.
    60885 replies | 2049336 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    Today was my first real job in a bucket truck, 40 feet, telescopic boom. A small one but well enough for me. It was along a sloppy road, clearing the way and the telephonic line from elms, black locusts and some other thorny shit. I was reluctant to use that (still I am), like the ladders, but I really appreciated the quick (relatively) and easy access to a lot of skinny limbs. I admit that I never could do all that in the day with a pole saw and/or my climbing gear. The thing has some subtleties I have to learn, like how works the leveling system (the electronic doesn't agree with the bubble level) and the strange thinking of the security system (at some point you aren't allowed to move but you have to figure why).:? It was an interesting experiment.
    60885 replies | 2049336 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    This time I gave up on the unit's conversion. :X I can't find a definite answer about gauge. The thickness isn't even the same between steel, galvanized and aluminum sheets ! What sort of unit is that :? When will you use the metric system?
    43 replies | 728 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Chipper carnage in Gear Forum
    You could try a soft shackle. It's basically a biner in dyneema. No worry at all for the knifes and there are some very strong. They say up to 22000 https://www.elagage-hevea.com/fr/demonter/connecteurs-textile-liros.html
    85 replies | 2321 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I use this cut for the vertical new tops on the lombardi poplars previously topped and other polards when the onliest (fast enough) solution is to make them fall through the crown. I don't like the spear cut because it can happen (too often for my liking) that I don't have the time to cut through top to bottom before that the top starts to fall, hinging on the uncut wood, aka saying that I lost the top on fence, wire or tangled in the crown(s). Instead, I cut first a bottom kerf up, until a slight pinching (if the kerf opens, I'm in trouble!), then the top kerf down, in line with the bottom cut. At one moment, the hinge breaks/slides. Take care, a high speed train is coming down just in front of your nose! I like the small (very small) lean which occurs during the pinching : The top's top is moving a little away from my head. To enhance this phenomenon, I cut a very narrow notch like Murphy's, instead of the simple bottom kerf. That gives more clearance over me but doesn't allow the top to lean too much and eventually breaking loose. Then, the top cut, eventually through the hinge if you have the time and... hide your head. Handy, but I found two main downsides : the wind, and a lack of reliability. I don't say that it doesn't works well. The problem is that the long top has all the time to brush against some other limbs and tops before the ragging mass pass clear your position. Result, the top inverts its lean and is sent back on you. Ouch ! I have been "brushed" more than a couple times. That could be painful.
    35 replies | 1087 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Today, a friend of my customer came and wanted to use her brand new chainsaw. He was here too tuesday when I cut most of the big Leylandii hedge. Customer worried a lot but can't say no. You have to know that this guy is nice and always ready to give a hand, helping as much as he can. Problem, he's a walking disaster and his help ended badly countless times. Know it all, but almost zero skill. He replied "no worry, I saw how Marc do !". Now I worried too, but can't say much about it. So I showed him how to start the chainsaw (!) and gave him 2 or 3 tips. Then I went to "my" tree, looking at the small maple he wanted to cut. Moderate front lean, so it should probably be fine even if he messed the cut. Some time later, I was delimbing and bucking my ash when he came at me saying "my chain is stuck". Not really a surprise. But the small maple was pieced out and he drove me to an other maple, taller and near the house. 2 leaders almost vertical, a third one with a back / side lean toward the house. Nice new tiles roof, not even finished. He did made some notch, but all the hinge was gone. The chainsaw stuck under a root swell was there as a wedge (luckily). The tree rocking in the wind was held by something in the middle and a buttress root on the bad side. Shit. Maasdam to the rescue ! Some tension on it to take out the imbalance, then a new notch over the messed cut. I didn't even have the time to start the back cut. Crack! over he went. But thanks to the Maasdam, he fall in the open area. Pfew ! Actually, he was held only by a pencil size bunch of fibers. I clearly felt some relief around me too. LoL
    60885 replies | 2049336 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Best Lift???? in Gear Forum
    Buy it, buy it, that's a tough pill to swallow !
    124 replies | 4368 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    You don't cry on the metal, pretty sturdy looking. I like that.:) Last year, I put a return filter on the hydraulic system for my small chipper (there was none!). Today, the filter cartridge unscrewed itself and drained out a good part of the oil tank. It has a small capacity and that comes quick. Shit. Hopefully, I was on the grass and not on the driveway. But that sucks. Driving back home to get new oil, back to the chipper, filling the tank (with no level sight, fun), about one hour of chipping to finish the limbs, all that with only one hour of day light left. Run ! It was really dark when I packed my gear. The cartridge filter is supposed to be hand tightened. But I guess that the vibrations and the oil's heat messed with it (first time that I run the chipper so hard). How can I make that it stays tight without using a more serious torque?
    60885 replies | 2049336 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    The MCRP has a 10:1 MA if you hold the handle by the end. But I don't see how we can pull 3/4 ton with it. It could sustain such a load, probably, but pulling it, no, not in my view. Firstly, you can pull your own weigh only if you have something sturdy to push against. On flat ground, it's only a matter of friction under your feet. The max pulling force is your weigh times the friction factor, which is always less than 1 and can be very very less than 1 (like pulling on gravel, mud or on ice !). Try to get more than that and your feet will slip. To me, my pulling with the MCRP around 900 seems a good guess. I need a load cell. Plus, this value is about what is claimed by the european reseller. Secondly, the handle is supposed to bend if we over load it. I never came close to that. But when I reach my max pull, the rope begin to be damaged by the ratchet spool, so I know that I'm near the limit. I didn't be able to make it slip by pulling though. Only once I got a slip by over loading it. It was in release mode for lowering a skinny Ailanthus : first, I pulled to reduce its back lean and to pass a nearby tree intended to be a guard, I used the side lean to make it shift in front of the guard tree (hinge already broken), movement stopped by the rope touching a third tree, then let go the felled tree between the guard tree and the third tree using the ratchet release. As the lean increased again and again, the load on the rope increased drastically to the point that it slept one step with a "ping", then two, then three in a row. The rope was secured behind the MCRP, but it was truly the time to stop before a full slip. The tree was lowered enough and at reach (barely) to piece its crown with a pole saw. I love this gear. Used today to cut an over grown hedge of Leylandii with back lean, tangled limbs ....
    7737 replies | 478201 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Time to time, I do that, but it isn't practical when you have to climb up and down many times. And with the rope in long loose coil to enhance its availability, you can be sure that some limbs will hang in the loops on their way down. It's the same with storing the rope in a bag on the ground. That works well the first time, even with plenty of limbs over it. But when it's time to change the rope's path, the bag stays where it is and the tail falls back in the mess (where it's guarantee that the rope make quickly a loop around a limb's butt or a stub). Stuck again.:X
    39 replies | 1016 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    At the factory, they use a lubricant to braid the ropes. It's a very small amount but it does its job. Either you wash the rope to get ride of it, or be patient, waiting that the friction does it for you. Both work, but the last takes a while.
    1271 replies | 105524 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    I use my saddle with a fixed central point for the main rope, ddrt or srt, and a bridge which receives the 27' lanyard (was a little longer initially :D). The lanyard works as a regular ddrt system, alternatively with the main rope. It takes its role on the D when climbing with the spikes. I tried the 540 thing, no way. I'm not gifted for spike climbing and it's a real pain. As soon as I can hang my main rope overhead, I do, and put back the lanyard in climbing mode. When I buck down the spar, I use the lanyard on the D (or the wire one if I climb just for that) and my main rope in srt shocked on the trunk at the same level. I'm much more confident like that. When the main rope's tail is stuck under the limbs, not only with spruce but every other species, switching in srt saves the day. As long as you come down by the same path than the tail. Thanks to the HitchHicker and now the Akimbo. Time to time I choke my lanyard, but it's only for a positioning purpose or if it becomes a tad short in ddrt mode. My weigh stays mostly on my main line, so the jamming of the knot isn't an issue and I still conserve the emergency lowering ability.
    39 replies | 1016 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread In The News... in Odds and Ends
    I bet that the next time, there will be less much companies willing to aid. Nice move ! And what if the utility companies send the repair bills to the municipalities?
    6285 replies | 231448 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    So easy !:D :love: Even with a good ropeman, these big chunks send quite a bang up the trunk when they crash on it.
    25 replies | 697 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Tachyon for me
    1271 replies | 105524 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Perhaps, but she said it well:P
    39 replies | 1016 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    They say that's good for a couple inches. Nice to check a board but a little short for a tree.
    6 replies | 163 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-27-2018
    101 or not so 101. For myself, that will probably be the next step in my climbing technique/gear. I'm not overwhelmed by the giant trees, so I didn't feel the urge to try this system when it showed up some years ago in the arbo world. Maybe it's time...
    8 replies | 247 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-22-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    If one knuckle jams, you can't open the Akimbo. On mine, it was the center of the top X. A couple drops of ATF solved immediately the issue. To ease the opening, be sure to well align the 5 pivot points before trying to put it in the triple X form. I still think that his design is genius.
    1271 replies | 105524 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Dandandatreeman videos. in MBTV
    The cut is very important but not the onliest main factor. If your wood doesn't hinge well, you can aim at your best level, great chances are that you miss the goal.
    40 replies | 804 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    Mineral oil for food use ??? That doesn't sound right.
    19 replies | 316 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    I did that too, but I use cannola oil for the chain. It doesn't work any better in the gas tank than the mineral oil, but I gives some interesting smell afterward. Suddenly you feel hungry, looking for lunch !:D
    9 replies | 199 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    My 150 came without dogs. I added them as a spare part after some times. Big improvement. The engine is small, though, you can't pry on the dogs like its bigger sisters, it would stall/make it slip. But they help to stabilize the saw and keep it cutting consistently. If not, the tank's seem protrudes and touches first the bark, tending to rotate the saw sideway and jam the chain. The oiler issue is annoying, but the oil quantity is plenty (when it works). The main problem for the oiling is that this baby saw doesn't manage well the chips. The 200 has the same issue, but not as strong as the 150. The sprocket is encased very deeply in the housing and the chips doesn't have a straight path to live the chain and flow out. Often, you get more chips coming out on the top of the bar (circling around the sprocket) than at the bottom. The sprocket's case and the bar's groove are flooded with debris. That slows down the engine a little and the oiler can't no more push strong enough the oil to blow out the debris. You have to run it at full speed in air for some seconds to clear the jam and get the oil again. I hate that full speed part.
    988 replies | 96289 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-05-2018
    I wouldn't even call that evidence. There are many possibilities for two datas being apparently correlated : cause, consequence, indirectly correlated, coincidence... It's very difficult to find the right answers with the humans, because many studies can't be carried out with a good statistical level. Humans are long lived (usually), with a poor reproductive rate, and penalized (from the experiment point of view) by both a complex population's genetic structure and a wide variety of habits/lifestyles. You can't look at it like the laboratory mouses or the drosophila's genetic. Way too many factors involved.
    178 replies | 8288 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    07-29-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Hitch Hiker X in Climbing Forum
    It has been tested, but the HH body has to be in floating mode to work properly. The principle is to share the load between the two pairs of slanted slots by the biner and the dog bone. The angles of these slots are important and set for that. If you put a permanent load on the HH body, this setting is no longer correct for one, and for two, the lower attachment point (biner, shackle, delta link for me) won't release the rope when you ask to. The HH body has to go down a little to reduce the tightening on the rope and to make it slides. Problem, the ddrt attachment would drag the body up. So, when you press the hitch down, nothing moves, unless you put on it more force than half your weight (+ a lot of friction). Even taking the slack out would be very difficult.
    74 replies | 1976 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    07-28-2018
    arborists and farmers:lol:
    54 replies | 1672 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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Age
55
About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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