• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    19 Hours Ago
    The metal hinge should be really beefy to sustain the giant load when the notch closes. It seems to me that some metal bits would fly around !
    101 replies | 1432 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    20 Hours Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    Logosol makes an electric chainsaw for their M8 portable sawmill, 4.8 or 8 kW. https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/saw-feeding-units/electric-chainsaw/e5-speed-saw.html https://www.logosol.com/store/sawmills/chain-sawmills/saw-feeding-units/electric-chainsaw/e8-speed-saw.html That's more than the price of the ms880 for the small one ! And even if the motor's housing is made in aluminum instead of cast iron for the ancestors, it's still heavy. They say 77lbs. A little too much to mount it on an Alaskan. Too bad.
    1165 replies | 123729 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread milling thread in Chainsaws!
    What about an electric motor? It could be useful for homework without pissing too much the neighborhood. Passed by Stig:)
    1165 replies | 123729 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Now, I'm confused. I don't recognize all the story and explanations in the stump's pics. In the two first pics of the stump (before fall and with the wedges already in place), on both sides the notch seems pretty clean. I can't see any evidence of a dutchman at the corners. The back cut is nice too (except the unlevel) ending precisely at the scribed lines. In the two pics of the stump after the fall, now I can see a dutchman on the butt, full width. But I'd say that it came here with the front hinge nipping. Second point, the back cut ends no longer at the scribed lines, but it goes beyond them, like half way of the initial hinge. The cut looks more messy in this part and there are some plastic shavings from the wedges. The wedges are heavily indented, as they were in the way of boring the hinge's back. So, for me, it looks like the nipping of the hinge occurred on both its sides. But what do I know ...
    101 replies | 1432 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    :lol: That may be a little too heavy cut to avoid sprouting though.
    38 replies | 695 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    About the rolling pin top, how I see that : you have a highly asymmetrical piece with a very heavy and massive log, and a light and wide spread limb. The last acts as a sail and catches the air resistance, while the log plumbs down. Initially the limb is completely side way ( fall wise), then it takes the least resistance path rotating and orientating the whole top like a bomb's tail. That gives some momentum to the log and because of that, the log continue rotating at the end of the fall, even once it crashes on the ground and the limb shatters in pieces. In the slow motions, you can see the log continuing rotating in the grass. I'd say that it takes about 120° during the air travel and the crush down, and then about 60° spin in the grass (log alone once the limb broke off). I didn't looked closely to the log's shape though, it could have been part of the final spin on the ground. Just a possible explanation, no guarantee:D
    340 replies | 9020 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Same for me. But two or three times in 10 years, I could had appreciate this handle : right side access only to the tree with a felling cut both too high to be done backchaining and too low for regular chaining. Well, at least it's clear in my mind :D
    66 replies | 3030 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Not in my 066 and ms440. The hole is drilled full diameter through the cylinder wall. Both décomp valves have a full access to the inside and their obturator is about flush with the dome's surface. If the little retaining rod breaks, the obturator will make a mess.
    93 replies | 2550 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    You can't change the heat resistance like that. What matters in this application is the friction between the rope and the hitch. This hollow braid is in polyester, so the fibers taking the bitting are all polyester. If they began to fail due to a too high temp, no matter what's in the core, the working surface of the hitch chord is destroyed and that leads to the lost of the holding capability of your hitch. Not a full fail, but still, you come down fast. At least, you have to mix the fibers to enhance the actual heat resistance of the hitch. You have some room with the polyester though, it isn't like polypropylene or polyethylene.
    27 replies | 799 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    Don't be fooled by the numbers given by the manufacturer. Tirfor's rating is a straight pull, the real usable force of the device. The others like to play with the numbers to make their products look nicer. The red one says 3 tons lifting, but actually it's only 1.5 ton on the rope, without the small pulley. Even worse, 6 tons dragging, impressive, but that's the weight of the truck to be hauled, not the dragging force. The ground holds the 6 tons, not the winch. It's like some small hydrolic bottle jacks, said to be 2 tons. But it's only the car's weigh, the lifting began to be difficult past the motion range of the suspension and no way you can double that to get the so-called power of the thing. I hate this practice.
    33 replies | 763 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Beside the primary predators like EAB, killing the bugs may not be each times an effective solution. A lot of bugs are attracted by the dying or /and compromised trees (age, drought, root rot...). Removing the bugs can improve a little the health of the tree, but not much, as they aren't the main factor of dye-back. Many of them just make the thing worse. The biggest wood borer in France is even protected by law.
    6 replies | 249 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10-14-2018
    This time I gave up on the unit's conversion. :X I can't find a definite answer about gauge. The thickness isn't even the same between steel, galvanized and aluminum sheets ! What sort of unit is that :? When will you use the metric system?
    43 replies | 1155 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10-10-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Chipper carnage in Gear Forum
    You could try a soft shackle. It's basically a biner in dyneema. No worry at all for the knifes and there are some very strong. They say up to 22000¤ https://www.elagage-hevea.com/fr/demonter/connecteurs-textile-liros.html
    107 replies | 3873 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10-08-2018
    I use this cut for the vertical new tops on the lombardi poplars previously topped and other polards when the onliest (fast enough) solution is to make them fall through the crown. I don't like the spear cut because it can happen (too often for my liking) that I don't have the time to cut through top to bottom before that the top starts to fall, hinging on the uncut wood, aka saying that I lost the top on fence, wire or tangled in the crown(s). Instead, I cut first a bottom kerf up, until a slight pinching (if the kerf opens, I'm in trouble!), then the top kerf down, in line with the bottom cut. At one moment, the hinge breaks/slides. Take care, a high speed train is coming down just in front of your nose! I like the small (very small) lean which occurs during the pinching : The top's top is moving a little away from my head. To enhance this phenomenon, I cut a very narrow notch like Murphy's, instead of the simple bottom kerf. That gives more clearance over me but doesn't allow the top to lean too much and eventually breaking loose. Then, the top cut, eventually through the hinge if you have the time and... hide your head. Handy, but I found two main downsides : the wind, and a lack of reliability. I don't say that it doesn't works well. The problem is that the long top has all the time to brush against some other limbs and tops before the ragging mass pass clear your position. Result, the top inverts its lean and is sent back on you. Ouch ! I have been "brushed" more than a couple times. That could be painful.
    35 replies | 1337 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10-06-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Best Lift???? in Gear Forum
    Buy it, buy it, that's a tough pill to swallow !
    124 replies | 4700 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10-04-2018
    The MCRP has a 10:1 MA if you hold the handle by the end. But I don't see how we can pull 3/4 ton with it. It could sustain such a load, probably, but pulling it, no, not in my view. Firstly, you can pull your own weigh only if you have something sturdy to push against. On flat ground, it's only a matter of friction under your feet. The max pulling force is your weigh times the friction factor, which is always less than 1 and can be very very less than 1 (like pulling on gravel, mud or on ice !). Try to get more than that and your feet will slip. To me, my pulling with the MCRP around 900¤ seems a good guess. I need a load cell. Plus, this value is about what is claimed by the european reseller. Secondly, the handle is supposed to bend if we over load it. I never came close to that. But when I reach my max pull, the rope begin to be damaged by the ratchet spool, so I know that I'm near the limit. I didn't be able to make it slip by pulling though. Only once I got a slip by over loading it. It was in release mode for lowering a skinny Ailanthus : first, I pulled to reduce its back lean and to pass a nearby tree intended to be a guard, I used the side lean to make it shift in front of the guard tree (hinge already broken), movement stopped by the rope touching a third tree, then let go the felled tree between the guard tree and the third tree using the ratchet release. As the lean increased again and again, the load on the rope increased drastically to the point that it slept one step with a "ping", then two, then three in a row. The rope was secured behind the MCRP, but it was truly the time to stop before a full slip. The tree was lowered enough and at reach (barely) to piece its crown with a pole saw. I love this gear. Used today to cut an over grown hedge of Leylandii with back lean, tangled limbs ....
    7755 replies | 481813 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    10-01-2018
    Time to time, I do that, but it isn't practical when you have to climb up and down many times. And with the rope in long loose coil to enhance its availability, you can be sure that some limbs will hang in the loops on their way down. It's the same with storing the rope in a bag on the ground. That works well the first time, even with plenty of limbs over it. But when it's time to change the rope's path, the bag stays where it is and the tail falls back in the mess (where it's guarantee that the rope make quickly a loop around a limb's butt or a stub). Stuck again.:X
    39 replies | 1288 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    09-28-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    At the factory, they use a lubricant to braid the ropes. It's a very small amount but it does its job. Either you wash the rope to get ride of it, or be patient, waiting that the friction does it for you. Both work, but the last takes a while.
    1280 replies | 107908 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    09-28-2018
    I use my saddle with a fixed central point for the main rope, ddrt or srt, and a bridge which receives the 27' lanyard (was a little longer initially :D). The lanyard works as a regular ddrt system, alternatively with the main rope. It takes its role on the D when climbing with the spikes. I tried the 540° thing, no way. I'm not gifted for spike climbing and it's a real pain. As soon as I can hang my main rope overhead, I do, and put back the lanyard in climbing mode. When I buck down the spar, I use the lanyard on the D (or the wire one if I climb just for that) and my main rope in srt shocked on the trunk at the same level. I'm much more confident like that. When the main rope's tail is stuck under the limbs, not only with spruce but every other species, switching in srt saves the day. As long as you come down by the same path than the tail. Thanks to the HitchHicker and now the Akimbo. Time to time I choke my lanyard, but it's only for a positioning purpose or if it becomes a tad short in ddrt mode. My weigh stays mostly on my main line, so the jamming of the knot isn't an issue and I still conserve the emergency lowering ability.
    39 replies | 1288 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    09-27-2018
    So easy !:D :love: Even with a good ropeman, these big chunks send quite a bang up the trunk when they crash on it.
    25 replies | 864 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    09-27-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Tachyon for me
    1280 replies | 107908 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    09-27-2018
    Perhaps, but she said it well:P
    39 replies | 1288 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    09-21-2018
    They say that's good for a couple inches. Nice to check a board but a little short for a tree.
    6 replies | 195 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-27-2018
    101 or not so 101. For myself, that will probably be the next step in my climbing technique/gear. I'm not overwhelmed by the giant trees, so I didn't feel the urge to try this system when it showed up some years ago in the arbo world. Maybe it's time...
    8 replies | 292 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-22-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    If one knuckle jams, you can't open the Akimbo. On mine, it was the center of the top X. A couple drops of ATF solved immediately the issue. To ease the opening, be sure to well align the 5 pivot points before trying to put it in the triple X form. I still think that his design is genius.
    1280 replies | 107908 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Dandandatreeman videos. in MBTV
    The cut is very important but not the onliest main factor. If your wood doesn't hinge well, you can aim at your best level, great chances are that you miss the goal.
    40 replies | 927 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    Mineral oil for food use ??? That doesn't sound right.
    19 replies | 383 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    I did that too, but I use cannola oil for the chain. It doesn't work any better in the gas tank than the mineral oil, but I gives some interesting smell afterward. Suddenly you feel hungry, looking for lunch !:D
    9 replies | 248 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    08-14-2018
    My 150 came without dogs. I added them as a spare part after some times. Big improvement. The engine is small, though, you can't pry on the dogs like its bigger sisters, it would stall/make it slip. But they help to stabilize the saw and keep it cutting consistently. If not, the tank's seem protrudes and touches first the bark, tending to rotate the saw sideway and jam the chain. The oiler issue is annoying, but the oil quantity is plenty (when it works). The main problem for the oiling is that this baby saw doesn't manage well the chips. The 200 has the same issue, but not as strong as the 150. The sprocket is encased very deeply in the housing and the chips doesn't have a straight path to live the chain and flow out. Often, you get more chips coming out on the top of the bar (circling around the sprocket) than at the bottom. The sprocket's case and the bar's groove are flooded with debris. That slows down the engine a little and the oiler can't no more push strong enough the oil to blow out the debris. You have to run it at full speed in air for some seconds to clear the jam and get the oil again. I hate that full speed part.
    988 replies | 97011 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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Age
55
About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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