• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Days Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Cold showers in Odds and Ends
    In my 20's I used to swim along the river in wet suit with the diving club. Then 20 years later, it was the training with the rescue dogs club, again in wet suit. Some times we even had to broke the (thin) ice. It was so freaking cold that the fingers can't no longer work. Not only you are like freezing to death, but you can't even undress yourself at the end to get back the dry and warm cloths. It was sunday morning, I was so tired and drained of energy that I often slept the sunday afternoon and needed the monday to recover. After the 7th year, I couldn't stand it anymore. Even my dog became reluctant to swim in the bad season. But taking a cold shower ? Surely not ! No way, even in summer. My good water temperature is just under too hot. I want to feel good, not awoken up, stressed, stimulated or I don't know which so called benefits.
    55 replies | 614 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I'm very pleased to have followed his advice too. I even ask myself if I really need to buy a 661 to replace my stolen 066. Well, maybe anyway:/:
    108 replies | 4371 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I thought about the rounds splitting and I found a way, but never took the time to try it. With a thin blade like a bandsaw, you cut the round in 2, 3 or more parts, then let it dry gently. Most of the shrinkage will occur freely, widening the cuts, but not by increasing the internal tensions (much less at least). Now, cut again at the previous cuts to eat the excess of wood in the middle, not touching the bark. Cut many times, keeping the kerf's sides parallel, until the outsides of the different parts meet again each other. Smooth the sides nicely, and glue back together the parts. The reconstituted round shouldn't move now, excepted if the ambient humidity changes drastically (don't drop it in the pool). Is that clear or muddy?
    73 replies | 1684 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Your choice or not, if you stop, you loose your ability so quickly that's disgusting. When I butchered my finger in 2017, I stayed put about 2 months to not take a chance with the skin and nail grafts. No tree, no chainsaw, even no homework. What a pity ! The first small job left me exhausted. I spur climbed a spar, only about 26', but at the top my legs were checking and were full of cramps back on the ground. Eventually I came back on form, but now I see my father staying for most of the day (and days) in his armchair in front of his computer, sleeping here for hours too. He struggles with his legs in the stairs, walking or even only staying upright. I told him that he has to keep moving and working around the house, it's mandatory to maintain the body in an as good shape as possible. But no way, it's too easy to stay quiet, doing nothing physical and seeping the screen. I can understand that easily enough but he's 82 now and I fear there will be no coming back now, only worser and worser.
    344 replies | 18533 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    I saw somewhere that they use a rectangular stick to have 2 useful thickness, either to speed up or slow down the drying.
    73 replies | 1684 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I can see what you say though. The stumpshot represents as much of a step during the fall if the edge crumbles under the load before the closing of the face.
    128 replies | 3002 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Rigging rings in Gear Forum
    Heat dissipation / heat sink, I agree. We can add a little bit more friction between the medium plane of both rings, but I have no idea of how much.
    17 replies | 290 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    I was aware of that, my comment was about your "no stumpshot" advise to avoid crushing the hinge.
    128 replies | 3002 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Rigging rings in Gear Forum
    Puting 2 or 3 rings side by side doesn't improove one bit the bend radius. Bigger ring, yes.
    17 replies | 290 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    Stumpshot or not, if the hinge is thin enough, its fibers are crushed down almost by the value of the kerf's width. The tree leans more by the same amount, no need to cut out completely the hinge on this side.
    128 replies | 3002 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    About the gullet, the concern isn't for the file's access because it can make its own. The problem is that the cutting edge has some trouble to sink in the wood and cut its nice shaving. At most, it can't do it at all. If the bottom of the gullet isn't filled down, that lives a little bit of steel outside of the actual width of the cutting edge. Two downsides : the bits drag on the kerf's sides, slowing down the chain and pushing the cutters slightly toward the kerf's middle (the kerf becomes narrower), if the unfilled bottom's gullet is big enough, it makes a parasitic edge which pushes the cutting edge out of the wood.
    46 replies | 932 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Week Ago
    The bright light is for seeing accurately what's going on. Gessing the sharpness by touching with the finger's tip isn't enougth. The finger can tell you that there is an edge or a burr, but he can't see the very little remaining flat at the front and/or the slightly rounded area on the top. The eyes can, at least with glass for me, if you try to catch a light ray on these tinny surfaces. If you see something, a small reflect, you have to file more. If you can't see anything on and just near the edge, no matter the chain's position in the light, you are good to go. A good strocke with a new file takes out about 0,1 mm of steel (0.004"). You feel the file biting the metal, with a "crrrriiiiss" sound. You have to put some force on it in the length but not so much sideway. If the file is dull, it's more like " swwwwiiiip". It doesn't oppose you much force to push it, but you need a strong sideway force to get some shavings. If the file looks shiny and smooth under the fingers, the teeth are worn out. If you find a hard tooth, a chock hardened edge or a rolled edge, the metal is too hard for the file. It just slides over and you can't get any shaving. You can eventually get through it by pushing heavily on the file's side, but the cutting edges of the files are now destroyed. If you came to bend the file's handle or just brocke it, it's a good clue too that your file is (was) worn out. An other clue : the dull file gives a thick burr and filling more doesn't improove the sharpness.
    46 replies | 932 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    In industrial supply, I saw some gear with a double rating. One wll for pulling, one for lifting. With a bit of math, that gives a safety factor of 4 for pulling and 5 for lifting. But that's for hardware. what puzzled a while is the tree cabling ropes. The rating is very different than our other ropes for the same diameter. That's because the safety factor is only 2 !
    48 replies | 2178 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    I modified a prybar into a look like felling lever, but I very rarely use it because I hate to hear it banging on my chainsaw during the climb. I found the usefull length for the magic cut is between 3 and 5 log's diameter. Under 3, it isn't worth it and the log can stall easily on the cut. Over 5, it becomes risky or at least worrying (in case of bad reading the local lean).
    108 replies | 4371 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    2 Weeks Ago
    The fibers aren't affected per se, but built on purpose. The cambium layer "feels" the strain on its axis and put in place each year whatever is needed to sustain the load. It can produce either more wood or densier/stronger fibers, or both. It's obvious with the wood's density in the crotches and stumps. Same with the compession wood in the conifers sustaining/correcting a lean or pulling up a limb to replace a broken top.
    128 replies | 3002 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Rope in Gear Forum
    Just to say, the Ashley's stopper knot looked too complicated to me at first. Studying closely, I found that it's actually a bowline with the working loop downsized to zero. Now I can try it without headhache.
    105 replies | 11547 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    OK, thanks to point that.
    55 replies | 1434 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    How tall they are and how deep they have to be pounded to get the numbers showed in Kenny's pic?
    55 replies | 1434 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    I got that too in some tall and skiny ailanthus. One spar's tip split in three parts when it hit the ground. But I didn't have trouble with barberchairing at the stumps.
    91 replies | 2123 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    It's funny how I feel at the same time contented and afraid by this amazing job. Hats off. I can't even think to climb that high, on the spurs moreover.:O I made a smooth cut too Tuesday. It was an apricot tree, sooo high that I dismantled the crown staying on the ground.:D Reg's vid was in my mind during the cut and I applied to make it nice. I was pleased (and so humbled) to lay this ridiculously small top.:boogie:
    38 replies | 906 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    He did well enough to me. Pro or not, I can't tell, but at least he knows how to run his chainsaw. Nice hinge. I see two problems though: - banging the wedges with a tiny hatchet and hoping that would be enough - cutting a too deep notch which gives a even harder time to push the tree over with the wedges. Thinking of this backstrap, perhaps it may not be intended as a backstrap by itself (very thick backstrap), but as a way to manage the poor access at the trunk. What tells me that is it looks somewhat parent-like with a quarter cut. Just add a bore cut first and you get it.
    49 replies | 1480 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-09-2018
    I don't how I ended to write CPE but you're right, that's CRP.
    39 replies | 919 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-08-2018
    For my usual job (arborist only, not logger), I see 3 levels of stretch in my rigging gear. - the 1/2" 3 strands, very stretchy due to how it's made and the applied force being not very far from the WLL. You get a good part of the stretch possibly affecting the rope. - the 5/8"+ (16mm) braided bull rope, lower stretch by construction. Used with the CPE, it has even less stretch because the sustained load is way under the WLL. - the wire cable of the 800 kg Tirefor. It has a little bit of stretch too, but I consider it as nearly insignificant in my application. I don't have worked with Dyneema (beside the tiny throw line), so I can't tell first hand about it.
    39 replies | 919 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-08-2018
    With a real static rope/cable, the tree will just "sit" on it, even if you didn't pull hard enough initially. That's assuming that you pulled all the slack off the system and beyond, though. The issue with a stretchy rope is that you have to be sure to overcome all the back load when you make the backcut. Basically that's putting the whole tree in flotation as is on the hinge. Hard to tell. If the rope doesn't have enough pull, the tree will set back on your bar somewhere in the middle of the backcut. You don't want that because the chainsaw is now useless and the tree becomes even harder to pull. The wedges not only help, but are mandatory to prevent this situation.
    39 replies | 919 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-08-2018
    As was the pecan... But I said that as a generic rule for me. Time to time, a crew says to me "put a rope in the tree, we will pull it". Just no ! I took down once a Lombardy poplar, cutting it in half to fit both in the yard and in the time allowed. Windy day. "we will pull it ! " Seriously? Maasdam did it. Same with a London plane touching a bridge with the highway on it.
    57 replies | 1301 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-08-2018
    and spins when loaded /unloaded.
    39 replies | 919 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-07-2018
    I wouldn't rely on the man pulling power. It could be enough some times, but it's very limited (force and time) and moreover, untrusty. Slipping (feet or hands), tripping, changing the footing at the bad moment, getting a cramp, wind blowing suddenly ... and you loose it. At least, use a device to capture the progress of the pull. But for me, the appropriate gear rules in pulling. One rope strong enough is enough most of the time and easier to manage. Don't over complicate it by many ropes and different systems if the job doesn't really ask for it. Keeping the right amount of tension on 3 ropes at 3 different angles at the same time is either tricky ... or unnecessary.
    57 replies | 1301 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-07-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Animated Shorts in MBTV
    Do you have such a so cool truck ?:big-love:
    189 replies | 14038 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-06-2018
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Stihl 192T help in Chainsaws!
    I know well the tiny piston but in the ms200T. The issue generated is more a lean condition, and an erratic rotation speed, function of the tiny air bubbles coming or not with the gas flow. I didn't though of the exhaust clogging. I have to check that. I don't have a screen though. Now, I have the low speed screw turned down to zero, but it idles fine, a little slow to rev up but cuts well. Funny thing, I can barely stop it by the chock. It seems to idle forever (at least 5 seconds) before dying. One pull and it start again, even shut off by the chock (instead of 3 pulls or more with the saw in good working condition). Strange set of symptoms...
    15 replies | 438 view(s)
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About Marc-Antoine

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55
About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

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