• Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    1 Day Ago
    That seems very thick for a hacksaw blade (the hand held ones). They usually live a 1 mm kerf. Outside the teeth, the flat metal band is 0.8 mm.
    67 replies | 1167 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Seeing again your pics in full size, I just realized that the "board" next to the log is the actual main clump of pulled fibers from the release cut. Amazing.
    133 replies | 4134 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    That's a serious equipment for the rescue. His trailer probably weights more than my car, and my own trailer would be crushed flat:D
    191 replies | 7641 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    5 Days Ago
    Problem, the HDPE is very slippery and you don't want that to keep a pile column stacked with hard side hits. One plate should be fine but I can't see 2 or more stacked and staying as is while you beat the wedges over them.
    8033 replies | 501255 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    Maiming only the cambium layer in different spots shouldn't put the tree to death because the saps would still flowing in the sapwood and in the bark, giving him time to overcome that and heal. Actually, the tree kills himself by isolating the thousands of small wounds. He closes the vessels, fill the cells with shit and abandon the area in the hope that will stop the intruders. As usual for any wound he can suffer from. But here, there's just too many. The opportunist fungus invading the wound and adjacent tissues don't help either. In France, the ash is heavily affected too. Not by the EAB but by a fungus killing the twigs, then the limbs, and eventually the whole tree (by contaminating the stump from the fallen debris). It's the "chalarose", coming from up north. Many many trees have a hairy look due to the replacement sprouts successively killed in the crown. Big amount of dead wood too.
    56 replies | 2811 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    6 Days Ago
    One problem when a hydraulic motor goes bad is the flow of metallic dust or even chips sent through the hydraulic circuit. The filter (if there is one) takes care of part of that, but not all. Plus some of the valves and distributors are still in the direct way (before the filter) and that's not good at all for their own function and service life. Avoiding the oil contamination is a big thing in hydraulic. It isn't a good advice to run it until it dies because that can lead to a way more costly / complex repair and more down time. At least, check it out to estimate the internal wear.
    67 replies | 1167 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    :lol:
    4846 replies | 128180 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    3 Weeks Ago
    Not only a food resource and an habitat for the ecosystem, but a soil accumulator too, purely mechanical. Dirt and debris stay and pile up between the log and the uphill ground, instead of being washed out by the rain and gravity. That makes a nice and comfy cradle for the new baby trees.
    70 replies | 1732 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    4 Weeks Ago
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread In The News... in Odds and Ends
    Do you never encounter a psycho cat ? He rolls on his back to be petted on the belly, as it seems, but catches your hand/arm. His technique : the front claws to hold the grip around his "prey", like a bear hug, the rear paws jerking to shred it, and eventually the teeth come in play to ensure the outcome. You can do nothing to avoid it, too fast, and no mean to "escape".
    6644 replies | 253536 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    02-05-2019
    You're crazy guys, but you sure know how to have fun !:laughing3:
    105 replies | 2698 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-30-2019
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Animated Shorts in MBTV
    A little gem in stop-motion. Awesome work. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hc5eKza3dhM" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    192 replies | 14612 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-30-2019
    I agree for the dust, but what about the chips and the fibrous things like the london plane fruits. It seems to me that it will make like a purée in the filter.
    111 replies | 2975 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-30-2019
    A rotary filter would work well, but it isn't obvious to install it on a chipper due to the lack of available space.
    111 replies | 2975 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-30-2019
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Bermy, that's what I got often in the pines, spruces or cedrus. I don't use a false crotch but a piece of a tubular webbing as a cambium saver. Handy for my style, but that spreads very well the occasional pitch on the rope. The cedrus are usually less pitchy than the others, except if they have been wounded. 2 weeks ago, I put my both ropes over an unseen glob of pitch, just at the top of a 65' cedrus atlantica. I "cleaned" the mess the best as I can up there, but that made the day a bit more complicated, overall for the next cedrus, around 90'. My solution when the Akimbo becomes stuck by the pitch is the same as yours : release the load on it (Pantin is handy), free the rope in the cams, give a little slack and reload it a bit lower. It helps to slide the Akimbo by keeping the lower half nose down to get a straight path for the pitchy rope. That's a slow descent. You are free to go up though. :D Avoid the pitch to keep it working. It isn't easy. Pitch sucks. Breaking news, I just got an email from Bailey's advertising for the release of the Akimbo:big-jump:
    1346 replies | 116022 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-19-2019
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread This is the Akimbo in Gear Forum
    Indeed, beautiful and so useful. User friendly too.
    1346 replies | 116022 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-13-2019
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Cold showers in Odds and Ends
    In my 20's I used to swim along the river in wet suit with the diving club. Then 20 years later, it was the training with the rescue dogs club, again in wet suit. Some times we even had to broke the (thin) ice. It was so freaking cold that the fingers can't no longer work. Not only you are like freezing to death, but you can't even undress yourself at the end to get back the dry and warm cloths. It was sunday morning, I was so tired and drained of energy that I often slept the sunday afternoon and needed the monday to recover. After the 7th year, I couldn't stand it anymore. Even my dog became reluctant to swim in the bad season. But taking a cold shower ? Surely not ! No way, even in summer. My good water temperature is just under too hot. I want to feel good, not awoken up, stressed, stimulated or I don't know which so called benefits.
    96 replies | 2068 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-10-2019
    I'm very pleased to have followed his advice too. I even ask myself if I really need to buy a 661 to replace my stolen 066. Well, maybe anyway:/:
    114 replies | 5665 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-10-2019
    I thought about the rounds splitting and I found a way, but never took the time to try it. With a thin blade like a bandsaw, you cut the round in 2, 3 or more parts, then let it dry gently. Most of the shrinkage will occur freely, widening the cuts, but not by increasing the internal tensions (much less at least). Now, cut again at the previous cuts to eat the excess of wood in the middle, not touching the bark. Cut many times, keeping the kerf's sides parallel, until the outsides of the different parts meet again each other. Smooth the sides nicely, and glue back together the parts. The reconstituted round shouldn't move now, excepted if the ambient humidity changes drastically (don't drop it in the pool). Is that clear or muddy?
    75 replies | 2961 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-10-2019
    Your choice or not, if you stop, you loose your ability so quickly that's disgusting. When I butchered my finger in 2017, I stayed put about 2 months to not take a chance with the skin and nail grafts. No tree, no chainsaw, even no homework. What a pity ! The first small job left me exhausted. I spur climbed a spar, only about 26', but at the top my legs were checking and were full of cramps back on the ground. Eventually I came back on form, but now I see my father staying for most of the day (and days) in his armchair in front of his computer, sleeping here for hours too. He struggles with his legs in the stairs, walking or even only staying upright. I told him that he has to keep moving and working around the house, it's mandatory to maintain the body in an as good shape as possible. But no way, it's too easy to stay quiet, doing nothing physical and seeping the screen. I can understand that easily enough but he's 82 now and I fear there will be no coming back now, only worser and worser.
    357 replies | 20804 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-10-2019
    I saw somewhere that they use a rectangular stick to have 2 useful thickness, either to speed up or slow down the drying.
    75 replies | 2961 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    I can see what you say though. The stumpshot represents as much of a step during the fall if the edge crumbles under the load before the closing of the face.
    133 replies | 4134 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Rigging rings in Gear Forum
    Heat dissipation / heat sink, I agree. We can add a little bit more friction between the medium plane of both rings, but I have no idea of how much.
    17 replies | 479 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    I was aware of that, my comment was about your "no stumpshot" advise to avoid crushing the hinge.
    133 replies | 4134 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    Marc-Antoine replied to a thread Rigging rings in Gear Forum
    Puting 2 or 3 rings side by side doesn't improove one bit the bend radius. Bigger ring, yes.
    17 replies | 479 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    Stumpshot or not, if the hinge is thin enough, its fibers are crushed down almost by the value of the kerf's width. The tree leans more by the same amount, no need to cut out completely the hinge on this side.
    133 replies | 4134 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    About the gullet, the concern isn't for the file's access because it can make its own. The problem is that the cutting edge has some trouble to sink in the wood and cut its nice shaving. At most, it can't do it at all. If the bottom of the gullet isn't filled down, that lives a little bit of steel outside of the actual width of the cutting edge. Two downsides : the bits drag on the kerf's sides, slowing down the chain and pushing the cutters slightly toward the kerf's middle (the kerf becomes narrower), if the unfilled bottom's gullet is big enough, it makes a parasitic edge which pushes the cutting edge out of the wood.
    46 replies | 1694 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    01-05-2019
    The bright light is for seeing accurately what's going on. Gessing the sharpness by touching with the finger's tip isn't enougth. The finger can tell you that there is an edge or a burr, but he can't see the very little remaining flat at the front and/or the slightly rounded area on the top. The eyes can, at least with glass for me, if you try to catch a light ray on these tinny surfaces. If you see something, a small reflect, you have to file more. If you can't see anything on and just near the edge, no matter the chain's position in the light, you are good to go. A good strocke with a new file takes out about 0,1 mm of steel (0.004"). You feel the file biting the metal, with a "crrrriiiiss" sound. You have to put some force on it in the length but not so much sideway. If the file is dull, it's more like " swwwwiiiip". It doesn't oppose you much force to push it, but you need a strong sideway force to get some shavings. If the file looks shiny and smooth under the fingers, the teeth are worn out. If you find a hard tooth, a chock hardened edge or a rolled edge, the metal is too hard for the file. It just slides over and you can't get any shaving. You can eventually get through it by pushing heavily on the file's side, but the cutting edges of the files are now destroyed. If you came to bend the file's handle or just brocke it, it's a good clue too that your file is (was) worn out. An other clue : the dull file gives a thick burr and filling more doesn't improove the sharpness.
    46 replies | 1694 view(s)
  • Marc-Antoine's Avatar
    12-28-2018
    In industrial supply, I saw some gear with a double rating. One wll for pulling, one for lifting. With a bit of math, that gives a safety factor of 4 for pulling and 5 for lifting. But that's for hardware. what puzzled a while is the tree cabling ropes. The rating is very different than our other ropes for the same diameter. That's because the safety factor is only 2 !
    50 replies | 3065 view(s)
More Activity
About Marc-Antoine

Basic Information

Age
56
About Marc-Antoine
Biography:
I'm 48 years old and a tree climber in urban area since 3 years.
Location:
France
Interests:
mechanic, woodworking
Occupation:
tree climber

Statistics


Total Posts
Total Posts
1,389
Posts Per Day
0.48
General Information
Last Activity
9 Hours Ago
Join Date
04-17-2011
Referrals
0